Why fuel cell cars don't work - part 4

Door mux op maandag 23 maart 2015 10:45 - Reacties (39)
Categorie: -, Views: 14.014

We have arrived at the final station of fuel cell cars. This is the end. We have seen how hydrogen is quite an annoying fuel to use in many respects and how other fuels have their share of drawbacks as well. We've gone over the technical details of a bunch of fuel cell types. I have even talked a bit about the economics of it all. Today I want to talk about what I think will be the future, and what we as a society should strive towards. A bit less technical details, but I hope it will be interesting nonetheless!

This is a continuation of a blog series, here are Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3 if you haven't read those yet!

This is an extremely long, in-depth blog series, so I'll start by giving you a summary. This summary will exist at the top of every part of this series. If you're interested in the technical details, please do read on and make sure to come back for the next parts.

First of all, HFC cars are perceived to be a good bridge between fossil fuels and full electric because:
  • You can still fill up like you do with a gasoline or diesel powered car
  • The mileage you can get out of hydrogen is perceived to be more adequate than what you get from batteries
  • Hydrogen fuel cells are thought not to wear out as quickly as batteries (or conversely, batteries are thought to wear out very quickly)
  • Hydrogen as a fuel is perceived to be a relatively small infrastructural change from gasoline and diesel
  • Hydrogen is perceived as a cleaner solution than gasoline, diesel or natural gas
In reality,
  • You cannot fill up like you do with gasoline or diesel. It is actually pretty ridiculous how hard it is to fill up a HFC powered car
  • You won't even go 100 miles on current tech hydrogen tanks that are still safe to carry around in a car
  • Fuel cells wear out crazy fast and are hard to regenerate
  • Hydrogen as a fuel is incredibly hard to make and distribute with acceptably low losses
Additionally,
  • Hydrogen fuel cells have bad theoretical and practical efficiency
  • Hydrogen storage is inefficient, energetically, volumetrically and with respect to weight
  • HFCs require a shit ton of supporting systems, making them much more complicated and prone to failure than combustion or electric engines
  • There is no infrastructure for distributing or even making hydrogen in large quantities. There won't be for at least 20 or 30 years, even if we start building it like crazy today.
  • Hydrogen is actually pretty hard to make. It has a horrible well-to-wheel efficiency as a result.
  • Easy ways to get large quantities of hydrogen are not 'cleaner' than gasoline.
  • Efficient HFCs have very slow response times, meaning you again need additional systems to store energy for accelerating
  • Even though a HFC-powered car is essentially an electric car, you get none of the benefits like filling it up with your own power source, using it as a smart grid buffer, regenerating energy during braking, etc.
  • Battery electric cars will always be better in every way given the speed of technological developments past, present and future
http://static.tweakers.net/ext/f/qZnH0ZgYIZwR0zGKp1YZjPsM/full.jpg

The shape of things to come

Autos
I have alluded to this before: I am a very big fan of CGP Grey and his robot future. Even without an impending singularity - the point at which computers have similar cognitive capabilities to humans - it is very clear that self-driving transportation machines - autos - are here, they work and they will only get better, cheaper, safer and more popular. As much as car enthusiasts will try to tell you otherwise, most people use cars to get from A to B and not much more. It is unnecessary to have to drive yourself. It is tiresome, you are very limited in speed because of the unstable human-car control system, it uses roads exceedingly inefficiently and people tend to make a bunch of mistakes on every journey, long or short. Computers are better. Self-driving cars will dominate in the near future. I'm betting money (and I have bet Reddit Gold on this with some random internet stranger already) that a significant proportion of human-transport will be autonomous within five years, and a majority will be driving in autonomous cars in 10 years.

The pace at which autonomous vehicles in general are improving is mind-boggling. Just a few years ago (2011) Caterpillar started a pilot program with self-driving hauling trucks in a single mining operation; today the majority of copper mining haulers are autonomous. In the entire world. Just a year ago the Google self-driving car clocked in its 700 000th mile without incidents. The two incidents it did have? Of course, they occurred when the car was being driven by a human.

Back in April 2014 it couldn't handle rain and certain traffic situations very well - this has mostly been solved by now. In less than a year. It was already better than most human drivers, now it's roughly as good as the most experienced drivers in the world working at the top of their game - but it can sustain this level of competency all the time. And other companies are competing as well; all software/tech companies of course. Because autonomous vehicles are not a car problem, they are a software problem.


I can't place the accent of this narrator. She sounds strange, doesn't she? Is she a robot, too?

And think about it. Cars are stationary almost 95% of the time. They not only cost a bunch of money to buy and operate; they take up the majority of valuable space in cities. Roads and parking spaces take up a giant proportion of urban land area. This doesn't have to be. A single autonomous car can service dozens of people, having to stop only to recharge once in a while. Even if this autonomous car needs to contain a million bucks worth of electronics and batteries - which it doesn't, but just for the sake of argument - it would still be significantly cheaper than everyone having to have their own car. There are very large economic incentives to make this a reality as soon as possible, both on the service side as well as on the user side. And as we know, economics ALWAYS win. In the future, cars will not have to be ubiquitous. The landscape doesn't have to be littered with these scars upon the name of engineering.

This is not to say that cars as a status symbol or cars for fun driving will go away. Of course people will have hobbies. But they will be hobbies, in places where people do hobbies. On tracks, on designated road spaces. Not on the main traffic arteries.

BEVs are the future
Battery electic vehicles, or BEVs, are going to be the dominant type of car in the future. The two biggest reasons for this are:
  1. EVs give practically unlimited design freedom
  2. Electric drivetrains are the most efficient and most versatile drivetrains
Let me expand on this a bit. EVs - whatever actual energy carrier you use - can be made in any shape because unlike internal combustion engine cars, the actual engine is tiny and can be placed very near or - in the near future - inside the wheels. This is then connected by means of wires to the energy source, which can be anywhere and in any shape. This frees up a bunch of space in places that were traditionally reserved for essential drivetrain stuff. All the engine gubbins in front can be transformed into a much more effective (and shorter) crumple zone and storage space. The torsion frame in front of/underneath the car can be greatly reduced, as the full engine torque doesn't need to be transferred through the car frame anymore. You still need to fit in a large amount of batteries or something like a fuel cell, but this can be positioned much more favourably. The Tesla Model S demonstrates this design freedom to a great extent - even though it's only a very early EV design.

https://acarisnotarefrigerator.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/tesla-model-s-front-boot.jpg
https://acarisnotarefrigerator.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/tesla-model-s-hatch-open.jpg
OK, the Model S is a giant car, but despite its performance-driven nature it still has more luggage space than most 'practical' family cars

But design freedom goes much further than just the physical. Electric drivetrains have much more ideal and predictable properties. Their torque-speed curves are basically straight lines. Power control is immediate and precise, with greatly reduced drivetrain inertia to slow down the response. This makes EVs much easier to use for self-driving cars than combustion engine cars.

The versatility of electric drivetrains stems from the fact that any type of fuel or even fuel-less energy sources can be made into electricity quite efficiently. You don't have this kind of versatility in gasoline or diesel powered cars. Even though those two liquids are chemically strikingly similar, you can't fill up either car with the other fuel. Let alone use coal or nuclear pellets. This leads to all kinds of perverse economic constructions like the OPEC; who have the freedom to put any price on their scarce resources because of nothing else than geography and culture. With electric cars, there is basically infinite competition from anybody with free view of the sky. Talking about solar.

The solar singularity is here
https://www.greenwizard.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/photovoltaic-cost.jpg

Solar energy is taking off like nobody's business at the moment. Fueled by a 15-25% year-on-year price drop over 8 years now, a system that would have been economically unviable in 2007 (§4/Wp) is now better than grid parity (§1/Wp) and still dropping double-digit percentage points per year. Actually, module price drops have been accelerating, with installation and electronics costs seeing only minor cost reductions (which is the most important reason for prices not dropping faster). Energy from new static solar installations is approaching §0.05/kWh in the Netherlands, and about §0.035 in southern Europe. This is considerably cheaper than energy from any other power source, and there is no technical reason that stops prices from dropping further considerably in the near future. Of course, the sun only shines during the day, so solar energy is no solution for the general energy problem. But it sure as heck is a great way to charge your electric car for almost-free.

In general, total vehicle ownership costs can be broken down as:
  • 35-40% depreciation
  • 30-35% fuel
  • 25-30% other
In the Netherlands, fuel is actually a significantly larger part of the entire equation, as the Dutch drive quite a lot and fuel is relatively expensive. Fuel costs clock in at a little more than 40% here. Imagine that part being basically free. Of course, there will be costs associated with electricity distribution and other practical concerns, but the energy itself is free. You can even put solar panels on the car (or car manufacturers can integrate them), providing up to 20% of the energy required for driving. The electric drivetrain and batteries (or some other directly-charged-by-electricity) are essential to this kind of tech working. This is the great versatility promise of battery-electric cars. It would be much, much harder to for instance do on-board water splitting in a fuel cell powered car with those same power sources, and because of the inherent inefficiency of such systems you would need about twice the energy to get just as far. Another way of saying this is that solar BEVs are a very short-cycle way to get energy for driving.

http://images.huffingtonpost.com/2010-06-20-toyota_prius_with_solar_panels.jpg

How 'free' is free? At the moment, residential installations in the Netherlands and Germany hover between §1 and §1.50/Wp; at the roughly 1500 hours of insolation we get per year this yields 1kWh/Wp per year. The economic lifetime of such an installation is 20 years, with typical maintenance costs hovering between §0.10-§0.30/Wp over the entire installation period. This means that you pay between §1.10 and §1.80 for 20kWh - effectively. About §0.055-0.09/kWh. Residential installations have relatively good pricing as there are no costs associated with land lease or ownership, nor infrastructure costs. Costs of commercial installations are significantly higher because of this.

For the next 10 years, depending on who you believe solar prices will at least halve. Complete installed price for an economically sensible installation (small installations will always have more overhead). This translates to residential prices of §0.03-0.04/kWh over lifetime. This is about a third of the price of utility electricity in the US and about 1/5th to 1/9th of the price of electricity in Europe. For a typical vehicle, fuel costs would go from about §0.10/km (15km/L @ §1.50/L) to about §0.005/km (125Wh/km @ §0.04/kWh). Of course, as demand for oil-based fuels reduces prices will go down significantly, but it is unlikely that ICE car fuel prices will ever be able to match solar electricity prices.

So, about batteries
http://teslarumors.com/News-2012-02-25-013_files/Model-S-Battery.jpg
Lots of Tesla Model S pictures in this post.

The reason why people like fuel cell cars and don't like batteries is the public perception that batteries don't get them far enough and cost a lot. This is true to some extent, certainly at this moment. Vehicle range of BEVs - affordable ones (not looking at Tesla) - is pitiful compared to even the crappiest ICE car. However, range anxiety - as this is called - is not actually warranted in most cases. And because of the charging versatility of cars, it's not likely to be a problem for BEVs either way in the future.

First of all, any range argument can be quite easily counterargued by saying that depending on where you live, between 90 and 99% of all vehicles can be functionally replaced by a 100-mile range BEV without any travel move being impacted by battery range. That is to say: the vast majority of cars never drives more than 100 miles in one go in their lifetime, and most of the long-distance driving is done by a small group of drivers in specific cars. Which can use something else. That's fine. These changes don't happen overnight.

https://www.navigantresearch.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/JGartner_EVBlogPost_AnxiousAboutRangeAnxiety_05-25-10.jpg

However, I am not saying batteries aren't actually limited. As much as battery technology has advanced in the last 10 or so years because of the sharp rise in lithium ion battery production, by far most improvements have been process tech and cost reductions. Lithium ion batteries are going to be, barring any very fundamental breakthrough, limited to about <300Wh/kg. Why? This is actually a very fun calculation. Lithium ion batteries are, like fuel cells, reduction-oxidation or redox cells. The two technologies aren't that dissimilar. As such, batteries store charge by ionizing lithium and some other oxidizer at the electrodes in the battery.

Lithium can 'store' one electron per atom, so you need 6.24 x 1018 lithium atoms to store one coulomb of charge. There are 6.022 x 1023 atoms in one mole of lithium, which stores 96508 coulombs. One mole of lithium weighs 6.94 grams and has a half-reaction redox potential of -3.05V. This means that 6.94 grams of Li can store E = Q x V = 96508 x 3.05 = 294kJ or 81.8Wh, which gives us the incredible energy density of 11781Wh/kg for lithium as a chemical energy carrier.

So... why... what!? This is awesome! This is about on par with other chemical energy sources like fossil fuels. Well, the devil here is in the phrase 'half-reaction'. This is only half of the story. For a redox reaction you need both the reduction reaction (which is the ionization of lithium) as well as an oxidation reaction to happen. And that's where things go wrong pretty quickly. But, just to give quick closure to this chapter: theoretically, a battery with only a lithium anode can exist. It would use oxygen from the air as the oxidation agent, and as such this is called a 'lithium air'-battery. As of now this is a fairytale; there are numerous practical problems with actually making this a reality and there is absolutely zero outlook on an actual working lithium air battery within the foreseeable future.

http://www.21stcentech.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Lithium-air-vs-lithium-ion-batteries.jpg

In actual practical lithium ion batteries, we cannot use lithium metal directly. The anode is usually made from a lithium salt, for this example we'll be looking at LiCoO2. The second side of the equation, the one missing above, is generally performed by carbon in the form of graphite. This is generally called the cathode (although more accurately we should be referring to the electrically positive and negative electrodes, as the two sides switch roles whether they charge or discharge). For each electron 'stored' in the reaction, we need to lug around one carbon atom, one cobalt atom and two oxygen atoms. These weigh 12.011 + 58.933 + 2 x 15.999 (+6.94 for the Li) g. This accounts for a 15.83x increase in reagent mass for the same amount of charge, to get to a maximum theoretical energy density of 744Wh/kg. Unfortunately, even that is way too optimistic for any kind of future battery technology, as a couple of quite severe technical problems (e.g. short circuiting through dendrite formation) don't allow the electrodes to be so close to each other that they can quickly exchange ions. So we need to introduce a lithium ion-conducting electrolyte in between the electrodes, which necessarily increases the mass again. A few different types exist, from polymer membranes (hey, remember PEM fuel cells? These are surprisingly similar!) in lithium-polymer cells to lithium halogen impregnated paper-like electrolytes in the familiar round lithium ion cells found in e.g. the Tesla Model S. This is a surprisingly large contribution to the mass of a lithium ion cell, and limits the theoretical energy density to around 300-350Wh/kg.

As long as we make fully contained complete redox reaction pair batteries, i.e. recheargable lithium ion batteries, this is pretty much an unavoidable brick wall. With current generation battery packs peaking at about 175-200Wh/kg, the best possible improvement we will ever be able to make is about a twofold increase in capacity and that's it. In other words: battery packs in electric vehicles will necessarily always weigh a couple hundred pounds, whatever you do.

So why do I think batteries are not a dead end? Well, contrary to fuel cells, batteries have a pretty bright future as far as cost reduction goes. As battery production has ramped up, vehicle-grade battery packs have fallen from $450/kWh (2007, A123) to $140/kWh (2014, Tesla). With the raw materials being plentiful, relatively widespread and very cheap, the majority of cost goes into process tech and packaging. This is something that is very optimizable as production volume goes up. So even though weight can't necessarily be reduced that much, cost can easily halve in the next 5-7 years with some speculating that Tesla will announce a sub-$100/kWh price point this year already for its residential battery pack (battery only).

https://www.businessspectator.com.au/sites/default/files/styles/full_width/public/22_18.PNG?itok=wfTOUwgp
As you can see, this is a very big case of 'depending on who you ask'. Predictions vary quite wildly

There are still some concerns; some more important than others. Environmental concerns around battery production and the associated pollution of lithium mining are mostly unimportant; the amount of pollution generated by the considerably higher amount of fossil fuels required for ICE powered cars easily offsets this. Recycling is an increasingly hard problem as optimal battery technologies make it hard to recover materials from lithium ion batteries. Lithium in general has fairly poor recycling characteristics. But again; the environmental and user benefits have been shown to, even now that the technology is still in its infancy, still outweigh the environmental downsides of traditional vehicles. And there is no fundamental reason why EVs wouldn't become better in the future whereas fossil fuel use is a guaranteed dead end with unescapable environmental concerns on both short and long term.

But our infrastructure isn't up to snuff!
Another often heard problem with electric cars is that our infrastructure will not hold up to the high peak demands from charging cars. This is slightly true, but not likely to cause big problems in the long run. This kind of runs into a ocmmon misconception in that cars/mobility are a huge drain on resources/large cause of greenhouse gas emissions. It's kind of sad that I have to touch on this so late in this blog series, but: cars ain't that bad. Yes, certainly, cars are incredibly inefficient and guzzle seemingly enormous amounts of energy from unsustainable sources. But if we look at the total CO2 output of all of humanity, all transportation put together accounts for only about 11-14%. Of that, only about 35% is embodied in personal transportation by passenger car. The rest is trucking, commercial use passenger cars, aviation, shipping and light motor vehicle use. That is: only about 4% of all CO2 emissions can be attributed to cars. If we look at actual pollution, cars amount to almost nothing. Actually, tire wear and emissions from the production and disposal of cars is a larger weight on the environment than the actual use of cars.

http://theenergycollective.com/sites/theenergycollective.com/files/imagepicker/476416/ECFig2.png
One of the clearer illustrations I could find of the relative impact of EV charging on UK infrastructure

This parallels electricity use by electric cars. If all of our cars suddenly become BEVs, electricity use won't increase tenfold. It wouldn't even increase twofold. Of course, even a twofold increase in capacity does require some extensive retooling, especially in third-world countries like the USA where the electrical grid is woefully undermaintained. But the investment in infrastructure to make this happen is absolute peanuts as compared to the infrastructure changes we'd need for, for instance, hydrogen or methanol fuel cell cars.

The real challenge here is not that we need to build twice the infrastructure we have; it is that we should decide right now how we intelligently charge our cars. If everybody hooks up their car to a charger when they get home, the peak demand will increase dramatically. If instead smarter charging strategies are used - spreading the load over for instance an entire night - the infrastructural problems will be negligible.

Mythbusting: Fuel cells are a conspiracy by Big Oil

Right at the end of this blog series I'd like to tie up some loose ends in the general discussion of fuel cell vehicles. One of the most important observations about fuel cells are that at least for the first few decades, the majority of hydrogen production will have to be done by reforming natural gas. With Big Oil - the OPEC, Russia, Nigeria, Norway, Brazil and the US - making so much money off of oil production, they don't want to see us going to free energy. So they invent something that looks and smells 'green' but actually isn't: fuel cells. That way, they can keep selling us oil, in the form of reformed natural gas. Sounds like a credible conspiracy? I'm not buying it.

For one, the costs and technical challenges that hydrogen production, storage and sale encompass are astronomical. Big oil has had decades of hundreds-to-thousands of percents of profit margin on their oil products to subsidize the oil and gas infrastructure we have today. Hydrogen is fundamentally incompatible with most of this infrastructure, but the catch is: there is no guaranteed market, no large-scale dependence and no revenue stream to bootstrap such a big infrastructure project.

Another big red flag is the fact that traditional oil companies have historically shown very little interest in this market. All of the sponsors for our hydrogen-powered race karts Forze I and Forze II were technology and tool/hardware companies. Only one or two companies can be tangentially associated with the oil industry; DSM being the only large one (who supplied resin for the carbon fiber body parts). Other international teams as well as the Formula Zero organization saw barely any interest. The hydrogen supplier was Linde, a company who mostly supplies fertilizer companies and other industrial purposes. And this goes for most of the hydrogen fuel cell market; the main players are struggling medium-sized companies like Hydrogenics and Nuvera who, if anything, have only seen a lot of competition from Big Oil.

If hydrogen fuel cells are going to become a big thing in the future, I don't expect oil companies to have much of anything to do with it. A hydrogen economy requires radically different thinking from traditional oil and natural gas-based industry.

Toyota's recent decision to go all-in on FCVs

Another interesting thing that has happened very recently, is Toyota's announcement of the Mirai FCV:
Today, we are at a turning point in automotive history.
A turning point where people will embrace a new, environmentally-friendly car that is a pleasure to drive.
A turning point where a four-door sedan can travel 300 miles on a single tank of hydrogen, can be refueled in under five minutes and emit only water vapor.

(...)

Our fuel cell vehicle runs on hydrogen that can be made from virtually anything, even garbage!
It has a fuel cell that creates enough electricity to power a house for about a week.

(...)

The name we’ve given to our new car is Mirai, which in Japanese means “future.”
We believe that behind the wheel of the Mirai, we can go places we have never been, to a world that is better, in a car that is better.
For us, this isn’t just another car. This is an opportunity – an opportunity to really make a difference. And making a difference is what Toyota is all about.
The future has arrived. And it’s called Mirai.
http://drop.ndtv.com/albums/AUTO/toyotamirai/toyotamirai6-gallery.jpg
You have to admit, that is some serious tech porn

This announcement was followed in January of this year with an opening and royalty-free licensing of a whole lot of fuel cell patents. This seems to be a large swing in Toyota's R&D, which of course produced battery-ICE hybrids like the Prius. A lot of people go so far as to say Toyota is going all-in on fuel cells and abandoning BEVs completely.

However, reading into it a little more deeply, things start making a lot more sense. Of course, at the current state of technology Toyota would not be able to make a production FCV. For all intents and purposes, the Toyota Mirai is a specialty car that serves more as a public technology demonstration than something you can properly buy. Production volume is announced to be 700 in 2015, going up to 3000 in 2017. For comparison, Tesla is now producing 50 000 Model S EVs annually, and they are an absolutely microscopic car company. Typical production volume for cars nowadays is in the hundreds of thousands.

Toyota aren't bluffing though. They have serious, innovative technology under the hood and I do believe they hope FCVs will be a big thing in the future. As far as I'm concerned, the Mirai is only a very minor step up from the concept that the FCX Clarity was a couple of years ago. They sure aren't going all-in. The Mirai is testing the waters and seeing if this fuel cell thing catches on or if BEVs will prevail. By opening their patents they hope for more competition in the fuel cell camp to fight off BEVs.

I don't think they will succeed. Judging from the information released, they haven't found any solutions to the fundamental problems with FCVs. They haven't made the Mirai magically less complex and they haven't sufficiently reduced platinum loading in the stack to allow for sufficiently large production volume. Maybe they have another trick up their sleeves, but I doubt it. They even doubt it because they're not actually putting much money at risk with their comparatively tiny production volume and R&D budget.

In any case, start stocking up on platinum. Prices are sure to go up as fuel cells become a hot topic once again.

Conclusion

http://static.tweakers.net/ext/f/jrA5JX5zd15bn5CpdfOpH9uz/full.jpg
We're done, we are at the end of a journey through the tech inside fuel cell cars - and other future cars. I don't want to leave you with a feeling of negativity. Yes, I am saying that fuel cell cars don't work, in any shape. I'm saying that batteries are better, in every way.

This part of the blog was futurology, i.e. talking about things in the future with a little bit of scientific backing. It's not complete hand-waving. I've discussed essentially two possible futures:
  1. Either cars as we know them are going away completely, being replaced by about 1/10th the amount of completely self-driving, non-owned transportation service autos
  2. or car ownership will remain, BEVs will dominate because of their significant economic, complexity and comfort advantages over all other alternatives
Either way, fuel cell vehicles make little sense. For future number 2, it would just require too much infrastructure for very little benefit to the end user. Cars would have to get more expensive and it will take a very long time before future 2 can be a reality.

Future 1 can be a reality in 5 years. This year already, multiple auto makers have announced production (i.e. you can buy them!) 90% self-driving cars. Tesla and Volvo are at the forefront here, the rest will certainly follow shortly. Uber has announced they want to move in the direction of a completely self-driving car fleet in 5 years. This is possible. The question is: will these self-driving cars be a minority or will it be disruptive?

Anyway.

I am just a dude, I am not an expert in basically any of the fields I have spoken about. I know enough about them to make some general statements and do some general back-of-the-envelope calculations, but a lot of the nuances are at best slightly vague and at worst completely unknown to me. I've been corrected multiple times on my application of diffusivity and catalysts. Not in ways that undermine my point, but just to show: this is not gospel.

I hope you enjoyed my extensive treatise of fuel cell cars and my short overview of battery electric cars. Again, I don't make a single dime on these blogs, I do these because I adore the subject matter. I realize that even with 120kB of text I still haven't even scratched the surface, let along the dozens of handwavy statements and predictions I made without proper scientific evidence to them. Leave a comment if you found a problem, error, false claims or if you just want to engage in a discussion about any of the points I raised. Don't agree at all? Do you have good reasons? Write your own blog post! Be sure to leave a link here.

Because this is actually important stuff.

Volgende: City cycling in London is a joke 07-'15 City cycling in London is a joke
Volgende: Why fuel cell cars don't work - part 3 03-'15 Why fuel cell cars don't work - part 3

Reacties


Door Tweakers user SA007, maandag 23 maart 2015 11:51

What is you opinion on this:
http://www.dailymail.co.u...st-approved-EU-roads.html

It is quite a fishy story, fitting a car with 2 200l tanks of (salt)water that can give 600km range.

It that would be viable, why isn't is used on a massive scale for every river outlet everywhere?

Door Tweakers user mux, maandag 23 maart 2015 12:20

Without even opening the link: The daily mail is not a source. It is a pit of despair where ascii characters go to die and burn in hell for eternity. So, very unlikely to be anything.

As for actual technical commentary: This is a very well-known vaporware investor scam. Nanoflowcell doesn't actually have working flow cells (which are a very promising technology! don't get me wrong) and all they do is periodically show something sexy, get a couple million dollars in investor capital and retreat to their vacation homes in Liechtenstein.

A flow cell (or flow battery) is a battery type where you store two charged electrolyte solutions and generate electricity by exchanging ions between the fluids through a membrane. Charging and discharging is as simple as filling up both tanks with the solution. Obviously a very attractive technology.

This is pre-alpha stuff, though. So far, very little has actually been achieved that can power something like a car. Also note that this article completely ignores that it doesn't work on table salt in water (which it implies by the title), but with other metal salts. You can't run on just salt water, you need to separate out the ions in solution. Basically, saying that a flow cell runs on salt water is like saying that you can power your electric razor with a lump of coal. Yeah, sort of, but not really. There are quite a lot of steps in between.

To give some idea about the current state of technology: you still need a membrane about as large as all the electrolyte surface area in a BEV battery pack (about 100 square meters) to get sufficient power for a car, if you want to be able to use the kinds of electrolytes (e.g. lithium-hydrogen) that have superior energy density to lithium ion batteries. So you need something as large as a BEV battery PLUS tanks that are about half the weight of the battery. At the moment, flow cell batteries are almost unusable for vehicle use. But maybe in the future.

As with other pie in the sky tech, I mostly try to stay away from technology that hasn't been commercially implemented yet. We all know the stories about FeRAM/ReRAM that 5 years ago were poised to 'completely replace all storage and memory in computers'. It never became anything. 99% of incumbent tech dies an early death.

Door Tweakers user SA007, maandag 23 maart 2015 12:34

FRAM is a thing, you can buy chips from farnell/digikey/whatever as a replacement for eeproms where you need a lot more write cycles of more speed.

They are really expensive tho', rougly 10x the price of a normal eeprom, which is why it never got used as computer ram.
Still widely used in for example data loggers where the extra endurance is required.

Door Tweakers user mux, maandag 23 maart 2015 12:42

Oh yes, they exist, but there is no way it will ever make it into mainstream. I've used an FPGA with FRAM. Pretty awesome.

Door Tweakers user delirium, maandag 23 maart 2015 13:34

[off-topic]
Bedankt voor de interessante multi-part post.
Posts zoals dit zijn er te weinig en lees ik erg graag; je onderbouwt goed, geeft technische diepte uitleg maar geeft ook een visie/mening.
[/off-topic]

Ik ben het met je eens dat de toekomst ligt bij BEV.
Toch denk ik dat het nog vele jaren gaat duren voordat dit gemeengoed wordt.
Daarom zou ik hybrides nog niet afschrijven, mijns inziens valt er ook nog veel winst te behalen door over te gaan op een diesel-electrisch systeem waarbij een generator een batterij oplaadt.
Hiermee kun je de range-anxiety ontkrachten, de 'drivetrain' simplificeren t.o.v. huidige hybrides en een soort logische stap maken naar BEV.

Ik zou hier graag jouw mening en inzichten over horen.

Door Tweakers user mux, maandag 23 maart 2015 14:22

Dit is min of meer samen te vatten met dit plaatje: http://gm-volt.com/wp-con...icle-adoption.chart3_.jpg

In deze blogpost heb ik het niet echt over een status quo-situatie. Ik denk niet dat de status quo van auto's lang door zal gaan. Maar als je puur denkt in termen van het huidige gebruiksmodel, de huidige techniek en weinig fundamentele verandering, dan is dit plaatje 100% van wat je wilt weten. Er zijn economische regimes waarin ieder voertuigtype zijn plaats heeft.

Ik zie niet hoe hybrides beter kunnen worden dan ze nu al zijn. Technisch zijn basically alle soorten hybrides zo volmaakt als je ze kunt krijgen. Er zijn hoopjes parallelle hybrides (Prius is de meestverkochte), er zijn een aantal seriŽle-hybrides (Chevrolet Volt) die doen wat jij zegt. Deze gebruiken al de meest efficiŽnte systeem-niveau ontwerpen die je daarin kunt maken. Er is hier geen generationele stap te maken; een paar procentjes beter kan het misschien worden maar meer dan dat krijg je er niet uit geperst.

Dat is waarom EVs net als PV-panelen en zelfrijdende auto's als 'disruptive' - marktverstorend worden gezien. Ze werken niet zoals traditionele zelflimiterende concepten - ze worden alleen maar beter naarmate de tijd doorgaat. Zonne-energie zal alleen maar goedkoper en wijdverbreider worden, EVs hebben aan alle kanten nog gigantische ruimte voor kostenreductie en performance-verbeteringen en zelfrijdende auto's veranderen compleet hoe we over auto's denken. En dit alles gebeurt in een ontzettend korte tijd. Tegen de tijd dat we 5% verbrandingsefficiŽntie-verbetering voor elkaar hebben met Atkinson-generatoren op seriŽle-hybrides zijn lithium-ionaccu's 50% goedkoper geworden. Daar kun je bestaande, inherent gelimiteerde technologie niet tegenop optimaliseren.

(edit: dat plaatje is trouwens ook een geweldige illustratie van hoe ongelooflijk snel batterijen goedkoper zijn geworden. Dat plaatje geeft de situatie voor 2011 aan, toen Tesla 5 auto's produceerde. Momenteel zitten wij geheel LINKS van deze grafiek! Nog geen 5 jaar is voorbij gegaan en EV-batterypacks zijn al van $550/kWh tot onder de $150/kWh gekomen)

[Reactie gewijzigd op maandag 23 maart 2015 14:25]


Door Tweakers user Ample Energy, maandag 23 maart 2015 14:46

I've read all parts and I just wanted to say I've enjoyed reading them. Very interesting pieces of work which taught me things and even made me laugh a couple of times. Thanks for your time and effort!

Door Tweakers user GrooV, maandag 23 maart 2015 16:59

You can't state that electric car's will be cheaper than fuel cars. As you said, only 30 (gasoline) / 40 (diesel) % are actual fuel costs, the rest is tax.

Fuel Tax income are almost 10 billion euro's, not even considering the BPM on new car's and road tax.

As the % of EV's in NL will grow, the tax income will decline. Our government will stop promoting EV usage and will start adding tax on the kwh price when charging your EV. (Public spots first, since those are easy to control) but eventually, even you EV charging price will be 50+% tax. BPM will be added to new EV's and corporate drivers will have to pay more tax over their company car.

So why would I want an EV in 10 years? The range is still crap, I can't use an EV to drive properly around Europe.

Actually, currently Tesla (80k+ cars are still NOT an option for normal people) is the only EV (Ignoring the electric train :) ) that can drive me to work 100% electric.

Door Tweakers user mux, maandag 23 maart 2015 17:08

GrooV schreef op maandag 23 maart 2015 @ 16:59:
You can't state that electric car's will be cheaper than fuel cars. As you said, only 30 (gasoline) / 40 (diesel) % are actual fuel costs, the rest is tax.
No, what I'm stating is that 30-40% of total cost of ownership of a car is fuel. That fuel is essentially free (i.e. an order of magnitude cheaper) for EVs.
As the % of EV's in NL will grow, the tax income will decline. Our government will stop promoting EV usage and will start adding tax on the kwh price when charging your EV. (Public spots first, since those are easy to control) but eventually, even you EV charging price will be 50+% tax. BPM will be added to new EV's and corporate drivers will have to pay more tax over their company car.
You can't tax rooftop solar. It's completely independent from any kind of centralized regulation. For that reason alone, I highly doubt EV 'fuel' will ever be taxed through the roof.
So why would I want an EV in 10 years? The range is still crap, I can't use an EV to drive properly around Europe.
The range of any EV today is perfectly fine for the majority of all cars. EVs right now are a perfect solution for the transportation problem. People who want to drive large distances are a very, VERY tiny minority. And there's nothing to stop them from using any ICE powered car. Nobody is going to forbid the use of traditional cars anytime soon, that would be crazy. You don't need to switch to a BEV, it will just be much more attractive and generally better than an ICE car in... well, right now.

Door Tweakers user GrooV, maandag 23 maart 2015 17:25

mux schreef op maandag 23 maart 2015 @ 17:08:
[...]


No, what I'm stating is that 30-40% of total cost of ownership of a car is fuel. That fuel is essentially free (i.e. an order of magnitude cheaper) for EVs.


[...]


You can't tax rooftop solar. It's completely independent from any kind of centralized regulation. For that reason alone, I highly doubt EV 'fuel' will ever be taxed through the roof.


[...]
They sure can, with the new "smart" meter's the utility co/government can charge you different for your own generated power. For example, added tax or lower pricing. It wont happen now, because this isn't affecting the tax income yet. But when it does, they will get back to the car owners again. Sure, a solar panel on your car would be hard to charge you for, but not when it's on the roof of your building

It would be stupid to think otherwise.
mux schreef op maandag 23 maart 2015 @ 17:08:


The range of any EV today is perfectly fine for the majority of all cars. EVs right now are a perfect solution for the transportation problem. People who want to drive large distances are a very, VERY tiny minority. And there's nothing to stop them from using any ICE powered car. Nobody is going to forbid the use of traditional cars anytime soon, that would be crazy. You don't need to switch to a BEV, it will just be much more attractive and generally better than an ICE car in... well, right now.
Most ranges are still a joke, I looked at this list: http://en.wikipedia.org/w...plug-in_electric_vehicles

Only the Tesla, i3, Leaf and the eGolf are usable. But the last 3 still require charging at your destination which is still not possible everywhere.

EV's with < 40km are the biggest joke, you cant even drive from Amsterdam to Utrecht with those

[Reactie gewijzigd op maandag 23 maart 2015 17:26]


Door Tweakers user RobinHood, maandag 23 maart 2015 17:43

Ik denk zelf dat het grootste probleem van "de gemeenschappelijke auto", zoals die in het begin van je blog staat, het probleem is dat voor heel veel mensen, niet alleen jongeren van 18, maar ook voor mensen van middelbare leeftijd en ouderen, de auto symbool staat voor vrijheid. De vrijheid om de sleutels in het slot te vrotten, en kunnen gaan waar je wilt. Misschien met een stevige "vvrrrrrrooooeeeem", van een "hoeveel liter per kilometer?" V8, misschien met een "bzzzzzzzzzzzzz" van een schattig 5kW elektromotortje.

De gemeenschappelijke auto die een redelijk vaste route volgt en zo nu en dan "oplaad" bestaat al, het heet de bus. Openbaar vervoer in het algemeen eigenlijk. Zat voordelen natuurlijk, maar ook meer dan voldoende nadelen, en als ik echt hťt nadeel van de bus moeten noemen, die hier op 2 minuten lopen vandaan stopt: Hij is er eigenlijk nooit wanneer ik hem nodig heb, dus ik moet ůf haasten om bij mijn afspraak te komen, of ik ben een halfuur te vroeg. Maar ook als ik gewoon zin heb om plotseling naar de stad te gaan, misschien wilt een vriend wel ff een pilsje pakken, moet ik eerst naar de klok kijken, en denken "ah, busje komt over 20 minuten"

Hoe dat anders is met een gemeenschappelijke auto, zie ik nog niet echt. Natuurlijk zou je hem kunnen reserveren, dat is leuk voor de genoemde afspraak, maar onhandig voor als ik dat pilsje wil pakken. Als ik dat pilsje wil pakken, moet die auto wel beschikbaar zijn, anders kan ik weer net zo goed de bus pakken, of die auto voor de deur hebben staan.

Ook is het openbaar vervoer in Nederland simpelweg te klote om je auto weg te doen als je lange afstanden moet reizen. Stel, ik wil naar mijn neefje in Kaatsheuvel. Dat is iets van 3,5 uur reizen, als alle aansluitingen aansluiten. Met de auto ben ik er in 2 uur. Idem dito als ik naar mijn neefje in Haarlem wilt, ik ben er in misschien 1,5 uur rijden, kost mij 2,5 uur met trein en bus. En in de weekenden bestaat het OV hier nauwelijks, zondag rijdt simpelweg helemaal niks, en op zaterdag van 9-17.

En in landelijke gebieden zit je ook met andere dingen, zoals boodschappen doen. Nu is hier de winkel wel te fietsen, 20 minuten heen, 20 minuten terug, maar een paar dorpjes verderop en je zit op meer dan een halfuur heen en een halfuur terug, en omdat je maar een beperkte hoeveelheid kan meenemen, kun je dat ook meerdere keren per week doen, prettig hoor, naast je werk. En de gemeenschappelijke auto is dan een hell, de een is met een kwartiertje in de Aldi klaar, de ander een uur in de Appie, een halfuur in de Jumbo en dan nog even snel naar de Lidl voor een lekker broodje.

Het is misschien een vooroordeel [die ik een beetje overdrijf], maar ik denk dat veel voorstanders van autonome auto's, en misschien ook wel elektrische auto's, lekker in grote steden wonen, een paar kilometer van hun werk, met de supermarkt op de hoek en hun familie in de flat tegenover hun. Dan is een autonome auto [waarom geen OV?] zeker te doen. Mensen gaan maar een beperkt aantal richtingen op, boodschappen halen kost je nauwelijks tijd en je hoeft eigenlijk zelden buiten de stad te komen. En als je al eens "naar buiten" gaat, is het OV meer dan goed genoeg, op ieder tijdstip, op iedere dag, om van her naar der te komen. Ik merkte dit zelf al toen ik in Arnhem woonde, OV werkte prima, bussen reden af en aan naar het centrum, en bijna overal was je even snel, of sneller, dan met de auto. En de supermarkt was 5 minuten lopen, boodschappen voor een week halen? Waarom zou ik? Als ik nog in Arnhem zou wonen, zou ik ook veel minder een auto "missen" dan ik nu doe.

Voor steden zie ik autonome en gemeenschappelijke auto's zeker wel aanslaan, misschien niet eens als auto, maar als autonoom OV, of gekoppelde autonome-auto-treintjes die ontkoppelen wanneer hun "halte" is, Hele steden zie ik op die manier echt wel autovrij of zeer autoluw worden, maar landelijke gebieden, waar zelfs het al "erg oude" OV nog steeds een ramp is, daar zie het concept van een gedeelde autonome auto echt niet aanslaan, omdat er imo te weinig voordelen voor de bevolking zelf zijn ten opzichte van huidge OV.

Elektrische auto's an-sich zie ik ook zeker wel aanslaan, voor normaal dagelijks gebruik is de actieradius van het gros van de modellen meer dan zat, echter, je loopt wel weer tegen een probleem aan als je eventjes 400km op een dag moet reizen, laat staan als je op vakantie gaat. Het meest logische lijkt mij dat accu's snel verwisseld kunnen worden, maar zelfs dan kan een kleine actieradius problematisch worden, again in afgelegen gebieden, niet persť Nederland, maar bijv. in Duitsland zijn al hele stukken snelweg waar benzinepompen 50km uit elkaar staan, niet te beginnen over ScandinaviŽ. Maar, die problemen zullen zeker in de nabije toekomst weggewerkt worden.

Door Tweakers user mux, maandag 23 maart 2015 18:25

Het idee van een auto als statussymbool of lustobject is... een hobby-idee. Een beetje hetzelfde idee dat mensen auto's kopen die 250km/h kunnen. Leuk voor op de Ring, maar dit staat volkomen los van het praktische transportprobleem. De twee dingen kunnen losgekoppeld worden.

Daarnaast is de auto als symbool van vrijheid inmiddels totaal geen werkelijkheid meer. Er zijn mensen die dit idee nog hebben - iets dat uit de jaren '50-'60 stamt - maar in de praktijk maakt de auto toch vaak een slaaf van de gebruiker in plaats van omgekeerd. Voor veel mensen is de auto een verplichte 500 euro per maand extra kosten. Noodzaak, niet vrijheid. Je hebt geen vrijheid om een auto te gebruiken als de auto een verplichting is om te kunnen leven.

Dus wat je ziet is dat de jongere generatie auto's (en huizen, en andere materiŽle zaken die traditioneel worden gezien als noodzaak danwel statussymbool) veel minder sterk waarderen. De nieuwe statussymbolen zijn smartphones, consoles (ja, echt), online immateriŽle zaken. Dit is wat men Generation Y noemt (ook wel millennials).

Openbaar vervoer in Nederland is extreem goed, als in, je gelooft niet hoe ultrabrak OV is zodra je ook maar 1cm over de grens stapt. Waar je ook bent in NL, je kunt openbaar vervoer vinden binnen loopafstand, en vervolgens stopt daar altijd minstens eens in het uur iets dat je verder kan brengen. In het dorp waar mijn ouders' vakantiehuis staat zijn er hele weekenden dat er GEEN openbaar vervoer is. Treinen die uitvallen en bussen die niet rijden omdat het vakantie is. Geen vervangend vervoer, geen borden dat er iets is uitgevallen. Als je daar strandt heb je gťťn manier om ergens te komen. Geen compensatie voor vertraging. En dit is 90km over de grens.

Maar OV is geen vervanging voor de auto, net als dat een fiets geen vervanging voor de auto is. De auto is een unieke niche van vervoer: persoonlijk, point-to-point vervoer op iedere tijd van de dag zonder enige inspanning en tegen opvallend lage kosten. Het is ontegenzeggelijk de beste conceptuele vorm van vervoer. Het is duidelijk dat auto's zoals we die nu hebben op een gegeven moment weg moeten (want olie is een vrij waardeloze energiebron op termijn om werkelijk iedere reden), dus op zoek naar een alternatief is hier nu deze blogserie. Dus, welke weg slaan we in voor de toekomst?

Dit is het centrale punt. Hoe dan ook, kom ik altijd uit op BEVs. Ongeacht wie ze bestuurt, ongeacht welke primaire energiebron je uitkiest, BEVs zijn de beste manier om auto's aan te pakken in de toekomst.

Hierna krijg je de discussie of en wanneer je de praktische kortetermijnbezwaren van BEVs kunt oplossen. Batterijen zijn een heikel punt, maar dat is hoogstwaarschijnlijk dit jaar nog opgelost met Tesla's model 3-batterij die naar verluidt onder de $100/kWh komt. Laadsnelheid is nog altijd een issue, wat op middellange termijn pas opgelost kan worden en in de tussentijd gecompenseerd moet worden met een grotere actieradius (500-600ish km, ruwweg de actieradius van de model 3).

Maar hoe dan ook: zelfs als EVs nu nog niet 100% ideaal beter dan alles zijn, is er geen twijfel over mogelijk dat ze in de toekomst op iedere manier beter worden. Dus dit is een goede weg om in te slaan met z'n allen.

Door Tweakers user GrooV, maandag 23 maart 2015 18:26

Alle vrijheid die auto's ons hebben gegeven wordt weer beperkt door EV's

Woon - Werk afstand OK, maar je moet op je werk naar een klant en je auto moet nog 3 uur opladen omdat je de gehele actie radius hebt verbruikt voor WW. Moet je dan alsnog met het OV? Auto lenen? Lief kijken naar je collega die laatst nog een Opel Kadett voor 300 euro heeft gekocht?

Ook vraag ik me af hoe innovatief het is om een auto de hele dag aan een stekker te hebben hangen. Stel je gaat naar een festival of evenement in the middle of nowhere. Dan zijn er niet eens oplaad punten. Dan mag je blj zijn als je in een straal van 50km er evenementen naar jouw smaak worden gegeven.

Daarnaast wordt de auto tegenwoordig uit het straatbeeld geweerd. Alles moet in parkeer garages waardoor je zonnepaneel weer niet werkt en je voor het dure laadpaal tarief mag opladen (straks met belasting). Veel parkeer garages bij appartementen hebben niet eens de mogelijkheid voor een fatsoenlijke stroom aansluiting, als die nog aangelegd moet worden mag de VVE dat gaan betalen.

Stel providers gaan 6G introduceren, maar de eerste tien jaar heb je weer het zelfde bereik als Greenpoint van KPN in de jaren 90. Daar gaat toch ook niemand mee akkoord? Jij zegt dat accu's verbeteren, maar het is nog steeds niet mogelijk om de accuduur in mobieltjes van 10 jaar geleden de evenaren. Mensen gaan daar mee akkoord omdat de huidige telefoons daadwerkelijk een upgrade zijn. Maar wat biedt een EV mij tegenover een FC? Zuinige auto's zijn er al lang (Lupo 3L, VW xl1 bijv.)

Heel veel problemen die je met waterstof gewoon oplost, ook al is het misschien minder efficient. Waarom moet er perse een "winnaar" zijn, We hebben nu toch ook verschillende soorten benzine, diesel, LPG & CNG.

Overigens komt Tesla steeds terug in de discussie, maar volgens mij maken die nog amper winst per auto(en dat op een 85k auto) Wat ook weer een teken is datr EV's nog niet rendabel zijn

Overigens type ik dit nu vanuit de trein terwijl mijn benzine auto thuis staat, ik ben dus best bereid mijn vervoersstijl aan te passen naar de situatie.

Verder negeer je een beetje het punt dat ik eerder aanhaalde en dat juist lange termijn is. BELASTING. Je wilt wel speculeren op de accu prijzen maar er niet van uitgaan dat de overheid haar verdien model gaat verplaatsen naar EV's

[Reactie gewijzigd op maandag 23 maart 2015 18:31]


Door Tweakers user RobinHood, maandag 23 maart 2015 22:33

Misschien dat de stedelijke jongeren, met inderdaad hun zeer goede OV, de auto idd niet meer als vrijheid zien, zoals ik zei, ik wilde ook geen auto toen ik in Arnhem woonde, wat moest ik ermee? De super was om de hoek, het centrum was beter bereikbaar met de trolley, wel jammer dat de reistijd naar mijn ouders gewoon een uur langer was dan met de auto, maar ach.

Nu ik weer in Friesland woon, merk ik ook aan mijn leeftijdsgenoten dat een auto echt wel een vrijheidsbeleving is, want het OV is simpelweg lang niet zo goed als in de steden. OV in loopafstand? Als je 5km wilt lopen, zeker. En dan heb je dus OV welke 1x per uur rijdt, op zondag niet en op zaterdag nauwelijks. En het gaat simpelweg langzaam. met het OV naar leeuwarden kost mij 2x zo lang als met de auto

Boodschappen doen met het OV is bijzonder onprettig, en iedere 2-3 dagen 45 minuten fietsen in mijn geval voor boodschappen is ook niet heel tof, en dan woon ik nog in de buurt van een super, schuif een paar km op en je zit meer dan een uur op de fiets voor je broodje.

Natuurlijk zijn er landen waar het nog beroerder is, maar, frankly, i don't give a damn. Dat maakt het niet alsof het OV in Nederland buiten de grote steden opeens goed is.

En daardoor zie ik autonome auto's eigenlijk alleen in de steden aanslaan, want in de buitengebieden zitten er imo teveel haken en ogen aan.

Accu-auto's zijn zeker een toekomst, met snel wisselbare accu's, of extreem snel opladen, dus in 10, liever minder, minuten van zo goed als leeg naar zo vol mogelijk persen. Is dat wel veilig? Ach, we pompen nu iets van 10l per minuut, als het niet meer is, zeer brandbare vloeistof door een slang zonder enige echte "zit hij er wel in?" bescherming. Een dikke vette stekker in je auto proppen lijkt mij niet minder veilig dan wat we nu doen.

Waterstof heb ik zelf nooit veel kans gegeven, er zitten vergeleken met andere brandstoffen/energiebronnen gewoon zo vreselijk veel nadelen aan, alleen op kleine schaal lijkt het mij toepasbaar, maar olie zal het nooit vervangen. Biodiesel uit bijv. algen geef ik al een veel grotere kans op groot worden.

Door Tweakers user Sissors, dinsdag 24 maart 2015 09:49

First of all, I really believe electric vehicles will be the future, considering that their engines simply are in every possible way superior to ICE. However I do disagree that range is not a major issue currently. First of all, at least from that graph you cannot conclude that for the vast majority of the cars no >100 mile range is required, that on average they don't drive more than a 20 miles a day does not mean they don't require more regulary.

To start with, every car which is taken for a holiday drives more in one go. Pretty much all of my family lives at at least 100km distance, I don't want to go visit them and hope there is within a few kilometre distance a charging location. The average distance my car drives per day will also be very low, since most days it does not drive at all.

Door Tweakers user mux, dinsdag 24 maart 2015 10:10

GrooV schreef op maandag 23 maart 2015 @ 18:26:
Alle vrijheid die auto's ons hebben gegeven wordt weer beperkt door EV's
Nope, EVs zullen in de zeer nabije toekomst ons juist meer vrijheid geven! Dat is het hele punt van deze blogpost (heb je het Łberhaupt gelezen?). Vrijheid van zelf moeten rijden, vrijheid van een fikse kostenpost van auto's en - potentieel - vrijheid van Łberhaupt een auto MOETEN kopen. Je kunt nog steeds een auto kopen, maar je krijgt dezelfde functionaliteit met auto's als service.
Woon - Werk afstand OK, maar je moet op je werk naar een klant en je auto moet nog 3 uur opladen omdat je de gehele actie radius hebt verbruikt voor WW. Moet je dan alsnog met het OV? Auto lenen? Lief kijken naar je collega die laatst nog een Opel Kadett voor 300 euro heeft gekocht?
Extreem lange afstanden zullen voorlopig niet elektrisch kunnen; realiteit van deze tijd. Maar op termijn is er niks dat de actieradius van een EV beperkt. Daarnaast is het ook onnodig om 3-6 uur op te laden; dit is puur een beperking van je elektrische aansluiting thuis. Li-ion auto-accu's kunnen vrijwel allemaal technisch opladen in een halfuur, waarbij je al na 5-7 minuten genoeg actieradius hebt voor 98% van de personenautoritten. Het is een kwestie van marktpenetratie voordat snelladers voldoende aanwezig zijn.
Stel providers gaan 6G introduceren, maar de eerste tien jaar heb je weer het zelfde bereik als Greenpoint van KPN in de jaren 90. Daar gaat toch ook niemand mee akkoord? Jij zegt dat accu's verbeteren, maar het is nog steeds niet mogelijk om de accuduur in mobieltjes van 10 jaar geleden de evenaren. Mensen gaan daar mee akkoord omdat de huidige telefoons daadwerkelijk een upgrade zijn. Maar wat biedt een EV mij tegenover een FC? Zuinige auto's zijn er al lang (Lupo 3L, VW xl1 bijv.)
Het mobieltjesargument is technisch bijzonder vals. We hebben het hier niet over vergelijkbare techniek. Dumbphones verbruikten meer dan een orde-grootte minder energie, en gingen toch maar 3-5x langer mee. We hebben simpelweg extreem veel grotere schermen en continue achtergrondprocessen. Batterijen zijn wel degelijk flink verbeterd, zowel op gebied van capaciteit (ca. factor 2,5 verbetering in de laatste 10 jaar) als kosten (ca 10x zo lage kosten per Wh). Dit zijn gigantische verbeteringen en er zit met name in het kostenaspect nog genoeg in 't vat om EVs goedkoop te maken - aanzienlijk goedkoper dan ICE-auto's
Heel veel problemen die je met waterstof gewoon oplost, ook al is het misschien minder efficient. Waarom moet er perse een "winnaar" zijn, We hebben nu toch ook verschillende soorten benzine, diesel, LPG & CNG.
Wederom, heb je Łberhaupt m'n blogs gelezen? Waterstof lost juist niks op; het is per saldo *slechter* dan auto's op fossiele brandstoffen. En als je al problemen hebt met de actieradius van EVs; wat vind je ervan om iedere dag in de komende 10 jaar 50km extra te moeten rijden om te tanken? Voor de komende 7 jaar zijn er namelijk geen plannen om meer FCX- of Mirai-compatible tankpunten te bouwen in NL. Een EV kun je werkelijk overal opladen.
Overigens komt Tesla steeds terug in de discussie, maar volgens mij maken die nog amper winst per auto(en dat op een 85k auto) Wat ook weer een teken is datr EV's nog niet rendabel zijn
Ook dit is een technisch valse vergelijking; Suzuki maakt ook amper winst (3% brutomarge) op hun Alto. Tesla maakt meer winst. Of EVs rendabel zijn voor de fabrikant is geen issue; de vraag is of EVs rendabel zijn voor de gemeenschap als geheel op de lange termijn.
Overigens type ik dit nu vanuit de trein terwijl mijn benzine auto thuis staat, ik ben dus best bereid mijn vervoersstijl aan te passen naar de situatie.

Verder negeer je een beetje het punt dat ik eerder aanhaalde en dat juist lange termijn is. BELASTING. Je wilt wel speculeren op de accu prijzen maar er niet van uitgaan dat de overheid haar verdien model gaat verplaatsen naar EV's
En welke belastingen er ook zijn, het maakt toch niet uit als iedereen ze moet betalen? Dat is geen fundamenteel probleem met EVs, dit is een probleem met de overheid. Voor de technische discussie is dit compleet irrelevant.
VasZaitsev schreef op maandag 23 maart 2015 @ 22:33:
Nu ik weer in Friesland woon, merk ik ook aan mijn leeftijdsgenoten dat een auto echt wel een vrijheidsbeleving is, want het OV is simpelweg lang niet zo goed als in de steden. OV in loopafstand? Als je 5km wilt lopen, zeker. En dan heb je dus OV welke 1x per uur rijdt, op zondag niet en op zaterdag nauwelijks. En het gaat simpelweg langzaam. met het OV naar leeuwarden kost mij 2x zo lang als met de auto
Dit is ook de kern van het aangehaalde artikel; jongeren (en nu ook volwassenen met kinderen) hebben een sterke voorkeur voor het leven in steden, zonder auto, mťt OV. De buitengebieden lopen steeds harder leeg. Voor het merendeel van de jongere generatie is de auto dus in toenemende mate een overbodig, vervelend apparaat.

Er zijn altijd uitzonderingen, Friesland zal nooit onbevolkt zijn. Maar verstedelijking zet door.
Natuurlijk zijn er landen waar het nog beroerder is, maar, frankly, i don't give a damn. Dat maakt het niet alsof het OV in Nederland buiten de grote steden opeens goed is.
Ongeacht hoe goed het OV is, de auto is altijd beter. Natuurlijk; het is on-demand point-to-point. OV is altijd verder weg dan je voordeur.

Door Tweakers user GrooV, dinsdag 24 maart 2015 10:33

Je negeert nog steeds de helft van mijn punten (heb je het wel gelezen?). Ik zeg toch ook dat mensen nu met mobieltjes akkoord gaan omdat het een technische vooruitgang is. Een EV is alleen maar meer rompslomp (steeds opladen, range anxiety). Van A naar B kan beter in een ICE dan in een EV, en nog sneller ook.

Daarnaast bagatelliseer je het stukje vrijheid, een EV kan je niet eens in een weiland parkeren omdat die dan niet opgeladen kan worden. Jouw definitie van vrijheid is het verplicht moeten parkeren op speciale parkeerplaatsen en je auto aan een stekker leggen? Met een EV (op sportauto's na) kan ik niet eens 200km/h in Duitsland rijden, zonder dat mijn actieradius tot het minimum wordt beperkt (dat is vrijheid).

Geen eigen auto kopen is toch juist het tegenovergestelde van vrijheid? Voor het huren van een auto zijn ondertussen al tig andere opties. Waarom neem je niet gewoon een taxi, dan kan je nog een biertje drinken? Ik snap ook niet dat je denkt dat een EV een lagere kostenpost heeft (vergeet je misschien weer de belasting die wel op een ICE zit?). Mijn vriendin en ik hebben beiden een auto, waarom? Omdat we die vrijheid hebben en willen.

Zelf rijdende auto's staat naturlijk volledig los van de EV discussie.

Er zijn allang zuinige auto's die WEL de vrijheden van een ICE hebben zoals ik al eerder aangaf.

Ja EV's hebben toekomst maar het is voor de komende 10 jaar nog geen vervanger van de ICE buiten de stad, laat staan voor minder bevolkte gebieden in de landen om ons heen

Door Tweakers user mux, dinsdag 24 maart 2015 10:49

Natuurlijk! Dat is het hele punt van de blogpost! We hebben het hier niet over het hier en nu, dit gaat helemaal over de toekomst. Wat doen we voor de toekomst? Olie is geen optie, er zijn min of meer twee redelijke opties om te overwegen: FCV en BEV. Welke is de beste?

BEVs zijn nu al voor veel doelen bijna even praktisch als ICE auto's. FCVs niet, en zullen altijd slechter zijn. Ergo->BEV. Deze weg moeten we inslaan, hier moeten we onze tijd in investeren.

Wat er hier en nu praktisch is, is obviously de ICE auto. Maar dat is niet omdat BEVs inherent slechter zijn, sterker nog, BEVs zijn inherent beter. Nu nog niet, het staat allemaal nog in de kinderschoenen, maar de potentie en economische motivatie is er om ze in de toekomst vrijwel uitsluitend te gebruiken.

Door Tweakers user GrooV, dinsdag 24 maart 2015 11:07

Ik snap dat het voor jouw vanuit een technisch oogpunt de toekomst is (en het zal vast ook in de toekomst meer gebruikt gaan worden)

Maar de toekomst die hier geschetst wordt heeft wat mij betreft een iets te hoog Jetsons gehalte

Door Tweakers user mux, dinsdag 24 maart 2015 11:14

We zullen zien. Ontwikkelingen gaan momenteel idioot hard. Zoals gezegd: nog geen 4 jaar geleden begon Tesla *net*, nu al brengen ze een 90% zelfrijdende auto uit en produceren ze vergelijkbare hoeveelheden EVs als ťťn hele assembly line in een traditionele autofabriek. Twee jaar geleden waren zonnepanelen nog een beetje 'meh, het is wel goed voor het miliieu maar ze zijn nog een beetje duur'. Nu is het eerder 'my god, smijt m'n hele dag gisteren nog vol, ik loop honderden euro's per jaar mis!'.

Het is moeilijk om in te kunnen schatten of en op welk moment er een kentering plaatsvindt. Dat is het probleem met disruptive tech; de hele tijd zien mensen het niet zitten en opeens is het zover en loopt de hele wereld achter.

Door Tweakers user GrooV, dinsdag 24 maart 2015 11:31

Ok, maar zelfrijdend staat natuurlijk los van EV. Een ICE VW Golf kan nu al netjes tussen de lijntjes en zijn voorganger blijven en zelf parkeren

[Reactie gewijzigd op dinsdag 24 maart 2015 11:31]


Door Tweakers user mux, dinsdag 24 maart 2015 11:36

Zeker, maar er zitten aanzienlijke technische voordelen aan de laadvrijheid van een EV die een zelfstandig rijdende EV - dus eentje die op z'n eigen houtje vele mensen op een dag vervoert - een stuk praktischer maakt. Die kan op vele verschillende manieren zonder menselijke interventie en zonder enige benodigde innovatie (contactloos) laden, kan het laden zelf regelen (om zo de goedkoopste zonnestroom op een dag mee te pikken zonder het net te overbelasten) en heeft directere en betere lineaire controle over de auto waardoor er efficiŽnter mee gereden kan worden. Het is de combinatie van EVs, kunstmatige intelligentie en transportation-as-a-service die zo interessant is, juist omdat al deze innovaties nu op ongeveer hetzelfde moment samen lijken te komen.

Door Tweakers user Paul - K, dinsdag 24 maart 2015 15:07

Een zeer interessante blogpost serie, ik heb ze allen gelezen en ik ben zeer onder de druk. Nogmaals dank voor de tijd & moeite die je hierin hebt gestoken!

Door Tweakers user Thedr, zaterdag 28 maart 2015 19:10

Weer een bijzonder interessante posting, en een mooi afsluiter van de serie.
Ik ben het volledig met je eens dat er aan FCVs te grote en waarschijnlijk onoplosbare bezwaren zijn, en dat de toekomst bij (B)EV ligt.
Waar het precies heengaat is natuurlijk lastig te voorspellen, maar ik voorzie nog wat meer coherentie tussen in je posts besproken technieken.

Bezwaren voor de beperkte range en opladen van een BEV zijn makkelijk weg te nemen. Ik zie in je betoog (ook de reacties hierboven) nergens terugkomen dat een Tesla model S in 1,5 minuut te voorzien is van een volledig nieuwe lading door de accu te verwisselen. Dat is sneller dan 70l fossiele brandstof tanken! Daarnaast moeten we, zolang wij zelf de auto besturen, om de paar uur ook een half uurtje 'bijtanken', waarin je accu zelfs al weer grotendeels herladen kan zijn.
In het geval dat je de auto zelf laat rijden, bijvoorbeeld op de snelwegen, kan je met 1,5 minuut onderbreking gewoon weer verder. Problemen mbt eigendom van de accupacks lijken me zeker niet onoplosbaar in zo'n geval. Je moet immers ook weer terug richting huis...

Ik zelf kan niet wachten tot ik een auto heb die iig de stukken snelweg voor mij kan rijden (>95% van mijn woon-werk route). Ik kan mijn tijd wel nuttiger besteden dan actief deelnemen aan de bumperklevende asfaltpolonaise: nieuws lezen/kijken, studeren, GoT volspammen of een powernap doen :z. Hoewel ik het heerlijk vind om in mijn vrije tijd een mooie route te rijden met de motor kan ik geen enkel plezier beleven aan de doodsaaie rit van huis naar mijn werk. Wat mij betreft verloren (kostbare) tijd.

Of het idee van een gemeenschappelijke auto aan gaat slaan weet ik niet. Mensen zijn gehecht aan hun stukje 'eigen' ruimte. Een echt gemeenschappelijke auto zie ik niet zo zitten. Iedereen gaat er anders mee om dan een ander... zie bijvoorbeeld het OV waar je de meest smerige dingen ziet (meestal is het wel redelijk netjes, overigens).
Ik zie dan eerder iets in een soort ťťn of tweepersoons cabines die zelf kunnen rijden, maar makkelijk in treintjes te koppelen zijn. Deze treintjes rijden volledig autonoom, cabines kunnen tijdens het rijden aan- en afkoppelen. Op snelwegen kan je een soort locomotief aan laten koppelen die zoals een trein zijn energie van een rail (op/aan linker vangrail?) krijgt en al dan niet onderweg de accu's van de individuele cabines oplaad. Of als die rail niet beschikbaar is beschikt over een meer conventionele energiebron.

Wat betreft het opladen thuis zal er een noodzaak komen voor hybride oplossingen. Met alleen zonnecellen komen we er niet, dat is een deel van de oplossing. Zoals je schreef in part 3 kunnen SOFCs best praktisch en efficiŽnt zijn voor stationaire toepassingen. Deze zouden bijvoorbeeld, naast zonnecellen, prima voor de energiebehoefte van woonhuizen kunnen zorgen, in combinatie met een opslagmethode (oa accupack in de BEV!) om pieken en dalen in het gebruik op te kunnen vangen. Ze kunnen draaien op aard- of biogas wat via reeds bestaande infrastructuur getransporteerd kan worden. Ze produceren daarnaast ook een hoeveelheid warmte die prima ingezet kan worden voor CV. Daarbij hoeven ze niet eens zo heel efficiŽnt te zijn qua elektrisch rendement; +-60% van onze energiebehoefte is warmte, 40% elektriciteit. Omdat je daarbij zoveel mogelijk energie lokaal opwekt en gebruikt/opslaat kan je uit met veel minder energietransport wat meteen minder verliezen oplevert. Bovendien levert decentralisatie van opwekking een lagere impact op van storingen; als iedereen een SOFC heeft en er valt ťťn uit, kan je best even van wat buren een bakje Megajoules lenen ;-)
Dit soort technieken, aangevuld met energie uit wind- en waterkracht kunnen ons als mensheid op een duurzame en efficiŽnte manier voorzien van de benodigde energie. We moeten overigens wel in de gaten houden dat we die energie niet over de balk smijten!

En zo kunnen we nog best even doorgaan met fantaseren over wat de toekomst ons gaat brengen. We leven in een bijzonder interessante tijd, waarin veranderingen en verbeteringen immer sneller lijken te gaan. Ik ben eens zeer benieuwd hoe we over 25/50 jaar terugkijken naar onze voorspellingen en dromen :Y)

[Reactie gewijzigd op zaterdag 28 maart 2015 19:13]


Door Alf, vrijdag 3 april 2015 06:25

I enjoyed the dig at the US electrical grid, but I also have to wonder what exactly makes it "third-world". I used to work at a generation cooperative in the state of Arkansas, as a programmer; and I'm not an electrical engineer; but I do know that Arkansas is three times as big as Netherlands, with a bit less than 3 million people, most of them quite spread out from each other (towns with km+ gaps between individual houses are not uncommon); the summer heat peaks around 42įC with high humidity and the winter lows are usually around -10įC but definitely can get colder; and there are of course the occasional tornados and ice storms. Arkansas's a bit on the small end, population-wise, but I've also traveled around enough to know that its population density is pretty typical for the interior of the US, and yeah, also typical is that incomes are really in line with second-world countries, so these states aren't particularly rich. I also know though that there are at least three regional grids in the US because just the Lower 48 is 3 million km≤ bigger than the EU, with 200 milion fewer people, scattered pretty good over that area; and some of those people are rich and some are poor, like the difference between Netherlands and Bulgaria. The climate challenges can surely be dealt with through engineering, but wouldn't there be practical economic limits on maintaining grids that have mandates to serve large areas of populations with densities averaging 25 people per km≤ or less? That grew dendritically (just like train electrification in Europe) from multiple points of origin? I feel like our rural poor grid gets nearly 99,999% uptime (I've lived on that one); we could certainly do it cheaper if we didn't mind actually living next door to people, and the money saved could pay for upgrades. Of course, you'd still have income disparity, and the rich grid and the poor grid averaged together wouldn't look that great.

Sorry for the creeping frustration; it can sometimes feel like Europeans don't really appreciate that making US-wide civil engineering projects happen is not particularly easy, and the only one everybody here seems to (mostly) agree on is More Interstate Highways.

Door Tweakers user maxtrash, maandag 6 april 2015 23:36

Bedankt voor deze blog-serie. Hoog niveau, zeldzaam. Ik deel je mening over de trends die je signaleert. Elektrische auto's zijn onontkoombaar en het lijkt me ook dat de vorm van elektrische zelfstandig rijdende auto's heel anders kan gaan worden. Ik verwacht dat er een bepaalde vorm van openbaar/taxi vervoer ontstaat, misschien een soort rondrijdende golfkarretjes. En de transportsector gaat totaal overhoop lijkt me.

De implicaties van het verhaal van de link CGP Grey and his robot future stemmen niet echt vrolijk. Hoe functioneert een samenleving waar een meerderheid geen economische bijdrage levert (kan leveren)? Hoe zorg je er zelf voor dat je (nog) wel bij de happy few hoort? Een economie drijft op kapitaal en arbeid. Als de factor arbeid steeds minder waarde krijgt krijg je een versnelling van de distributie van welvaart naar een select aantal personen.

Daarover gesproken: heb eens zitten onderzoeken of het zin heeft te investeren in Tesla. Ben echter tot de conclusie gekomen dat het wellicht te laat is. De koers is verzesvoudigd en het lijkt bijna onmogelijk dat dat nogmaals gebeurt. Welke bedrijven/grondstoffen gaan profiteren in de toekomst van deze ontwikkelingen, heb je daar nog een goed idee over?

Door Tweakers user databeestje, donderdag 9 april 2015 23:07

@Alf I think mux is mostly pointing that stick to California which has seen quite a few brownouts over the years, much attributed to the rise of the household AC units.

To be fair, some of the winter weather is truly awful, and that brings us to overhead power lines. While I was in Kentucky, I noticed most everything including power and cable is from overhead wiring. In one of the great ice storms (2007?) the falling branches left most of Louisville without power. The friend I know there was without power for over a week before power was restored. Something that generally doesn't happen with underground power lines.

He has his occasional power outages, but most are fixed in a matter of hours, and, most are from damage to the power lines. (including cars driving into the poles)

To be fair, France has a similar method of bringing power and telephony to the houses, it's just so much cheaper, but it is far more fragile. The amount of power (and internet) outages there are comparable. The interior of France is very comparable in this respect with population as well, spreading population thin.

The side effect is that they also require far less power considering they have far less cars. And most of the stuff they drive are tractors anyhow.

Door Nobahamas, zondag 3 mei 2015 23:36

Mux, thank you very much for sharing your expertise with us.
I've learned a lot, have better understanding of the chances for, and problems with moblility based on hydrogen.
I still see chances for large stationary systems (powerplant backup systems)

What is your opinion about isobutanol, a small sector, still a combustion fuel, but when it is harvested from agricultural waste..

Mux, thanks for all the energy you have put in to these articles to present a fair view.

p.s. who are you?

Door Tweakers user HallonRubus, maandag 4 mei 2015 15:15

Over de Lithium-Air batterij: het bestaat wel in het lab, maar het is inderdaad verre van praktisch bruikbaar.
Ik doe nu mijn bachelor eindproject bij een Phd die ermee bezig is en in ieder geval is het aantal laadcycli nog erg laag.

Zelf doe ik mijn project over lithium-silicium batterijen, die theoretisch een 10 keer hogere capaciteit hebben dan de huidige lithium-grafiet batterijen. Ook hier zijn er problemen, ten eerste de SEI layer, silicium reageert met de electrolyt, dit zet zich af op het oppervlak van de cathode, waardoor de lithiumionen minder makkelijk kunnen combineren met het silicium. En verder onttrekt de SEI layer lithium uit de laadcyclus, wat de capaciteit verminderd.
Verder is er het probleem van volumeverandering. Als je een Li-grafiet batterij ontlaadt en lithium ionen met grafiet combineren zet dit materiaal slechts 14% uit, bij een Li-Si batterij is de uitzetting 400%. Naast problemen voor de behuizing zorgt deze uitzetting er ook voor dat het silicium zeg maar uit elkaar valt en er geen geleiding meer is naar de contacten van de batterij. Al deze problemen spelen overigens ook in mindere mate bij de huidige lithiium batterijen, en zijn de belangrijkste oorzaak van het verlies in capaciteit met toenemende laadcycli.

Tot nu toe onderzoeken we deze batterijen hoogtuit als een soort knoopcel met een capaciteit van een paar tiende mAh, welke slechts enkele laadcycli kunnen doorstaan.

Door Tweakers user kgd92, woensdag 22 juli 2015 13:29

Allereerst wil ik even kwijt dat deze blogserie zeer prettig weg leest. Goed geschreven, duidelijke onderbouwing en blijft interessant!

Ben het met je eens dat waterstof voor personen transport, in elk geval in de nabije toekomst, inderdaad geen oplossing zal zijn. Wel verwacht ik dat waterstof wel eens een van de energievormen zou kunnen zijn die een groot deel van de energievoorziening die nu uit olie wordt gehaald gaat vervangen. Idealiter zou een combinatie van waterstof en groene energiebronnen (wind/water/zon/etc, die vervolgens ook weer gebruikt worden om waterstof te produceren) een sluitende oplossing kunnen vormen.

Zoals je zegt is de wetenschap nog niet op dit punt beland, maar als ik iets weet is dat er nog steeds elke jaar ontzettend veel nieuwe materialen en katalysatoren worden gevonden met duizend-en-een toepassingen. Ik loop zelf nu een masterstage in Utrecht, waar ik werk met natrium alanaat (een complexe metaal hydride die, grappig genoeg, vooral toepassing heeft in de opslag van waterstof in vaste vorm, ook al doe ik onderzoek naar de hydrogenerende eigenschappen) en heb ook contact met collega's die onderzoek (hebben gedaan) doen naar opslag en gebruik van waterstof. De ontwikkelingen staan zeker nog niet stil, grootste problemen zijn echter het opschalen vanaf labschaal en, inderdaad, de immens hoge druk die vaak nodig is met alle gevaren van dien.

Dat gezegd, is er best veel vooruitgang de laatste tijd! opslag van waterstof in vaste vorm heeft een ontzettende vlucht gemaakt. Dit is natuurlijk niet direct praktisch voor auto's, want voor vaste opslag is een medium nodig en dat medium betekent gewicht, echter biedt het zeker mogelijkheden om op vrij korte termijn relatief goedkoop en in bruikbare hoeveelheden waterstof te kunnen opslaan en vervoeren. Zelfs zonder edelmetalen te gebruiken! Want het terugbrengen van het opslagmedium tot de nanoschaal heeft aanzienlijke positieve invloed op de eigenschappen.

Het platina probleem is voor zover ik weet nog niet echt een oplossing voor. Wat ik wel weet is dat hier hard naar gezocht wordt en dat ze al aardig dicht in de buurt komen, met het probleem dat de nieuwe katalysatoren vaak nog niet te regeneren zijn.

Dus hoewel auto's op waterstof inderdaad onwaarschijnlijk lijken, zeker met de verbetering in batterijen die aangekondigd zijn en binnen enkele jaren hopelijk geimplementeerd zullen worden, denk ik dat waterstof zeker een grote rol gaat spelen in de samenleving na het olie tijdperk. Voor hoe lang? Geen idee, aangezien de zon theoretisch genoeg energie levert en elektriciteit direct van zonepanelen, zonder de noodzaak tot omzetten in andere energievormen, waarschijnlijk de meest efficiente methode zal zijn.

En toch, schrijf ik de auto op waterstof ook nog niet helemaal af. Er hoeft maar een iemand met een briljant idee te komen, you never know...

Door Tweakers user mux, woensdag 22 juli 2015 16:29

kgd92 schreef op woensdag 22 juli 2015 @ 13:29:
Idealiter zou een combinatie van waterstof en groene energiebronnen (wind/water/zon/etc, die vervolgens ook weer gebruikt worden om waterstof te produceren) een sluitende oplossing kunnen vormen.
Maar waarom? Waterstofopslag heeft maar ťťn fundamenteel voordeel: gravimetrische dichtheid. Dit is waarom het interessant is voor vervoerstoepassingen, waar gewichtsreductie belangrijk is. Op iedere andere manier is het altijd een fundamenteel slechtere energie-opslagmethode dan andere chemische opslag (bijv. synthetische koolwaterstoffen) of batterijen. En wanneer je de ondersteunende systemen meeneemt is waterstof zelfs met futuristische techniek niet competitief.
Zoals je zegt is de wetenschap nog niet op dit punt beland, maar als ik iets weet is dat er nog steeds elke jaar ontzettend veel nieuwe materialen en katalysatoren worden gevonden met duizend-en-een toepassingen. Ik loop zelf nu een masterstage in Utrecht, waar ik werk met natrium alanaat (...)
Cool! Vergis je trouwens niet in de 'ontzettend veel nieuwe materialen (...)'; een hoop onderzoek in alle velden van wetenschap - niet alleen waterstofenergie - is min of meer al verouderd bij het uitkomen en niet veel meer dan een manier om mensen MSc/PhD-diploma's te geven. Het echt interessante onderzoek - postdocwerk, leerstoel-doelstellingen, etc. - is op het gebied van waterstoftechniek al een tijdje aan het stagneren. Voornamelijk door een structureel gebrek aan geld en vrijwel afwezige industrie. Alle bedrijven die als core business waterstof-brandstofcellen draaien ofwel al jaren verlies, ofwel hebben al in een decennium geen groei gezien. Een gezonde onderzoeksomgeving vereist een sterke industrie die in staat is geld in onderzoek te pompen en een gestage vraag naar afgestudeerde specialisten vormt.

Ik houd dit veld al tijden in de gaten, al sinds vůůrdat ik in Formula Zero meedeed. Ieder jaar komen er weer 'doorbraken' langs die geen doorbraken zijn. Je wordt al heel snel doof voor alle superlatieven die in persberichten staan om meer onderzoeksgeld vrij te maken. Feit is:
- We zitten nog steeds met een platinaloading van orde grammen per kW
- We zitten nog steeds met een well-to-wheel-efficiency van sub-20%
- We hebben nog steeds geen oplossing voor het distributieprobleem, ondanks dat we eigenlijk 10 jaar geleden al hadden moeten beginnen met het bouwen van de infrastructuur
- Techniek van 10 of meer jaar geleden is nog steeds niet vercommercialiseerd

Dit is kapot op zoveel manieren, dat ik er geen heil in zie dat dit ooit nog wat wordt. Ondertussen raggen we al rond in elektrische auto's die goedkoper zijn dan benzine-auto's, sneller gaan dan supercars en alsnog 500km meegaan op de batterij. Terwijl 10 jaar geleden elektrische auto's nog aanzienlijk minder aantrekkelijk leken dan waterstofauto's.
opslag van waterstof in vaste vorm heeft een ontzettende vlucht gemaakt. (...)
Helaas... dit is wat ik bedoel met dat er niks is veranderd in 10 jaar: adsorptie-opslag is al commercieel verkrijgbaar sinds... 1975. filmpje uit vroege jaren '80 en hier wordt er gedaan alsof ze iets nieuws hebben bedacht. Nope, gewoon een modernere vorm van een metaalhydridetank. Nieuwe adsorptietanks hebben kleine verbeteringen, maar er is hier niks fundamenteel nieuws aan de hand. Daarom gebruikt Toyota ook nog gewoon hogedruktanks: deze hebben nog steeds veel betere performance (voornamelijk hogere flowrate, maar ook hogere gravimetrische opslagdichtheid) dan metaalhydridetanks.

{ik heb een paar minuten rondgezocht naar een ander mooi filmpje van een man die in 2003-2004 een waterstofauto had gemaakt met metaalhydridetanks, maar ik ben hem kwijt. Ik edit hem hier in als ik hem alsnog vind}
Het platina probleem is voor zover ik weet nog niet echt een oplossing voor. Wat ik wel weet is dat hier hard naar gezocht wordt en dat ze al aardig dicht in de buurt komen, met het probleem dat de nieuwe katalysatoren vaak nog niet te regeneren zijn.
Dit is een fascinerend onderzoeksveld. Ik heb veel hoop dat dit over niet al te lange tijd nog wel eens opgelost wordt, gezien het platinaprobleem extreem belangrijk is in veel industrieŽn. Er zit erg veel geld achter om dit te fiksen. Dat gezegd hebbende: we zijn al meer dan een eeuw bezig betere katalysatoren te vinden. Pas heel recent hebben we echt iets nieuws voor handen dat hiermee kan helpen, en dat is computationele chemie, waarbij de interacties tussen individuele atomen kunnen worden berekend met opvallend goede nauwkeurigheid. Een vriend van me zit in computationele metallurgie, en daar worden grote stappen gemaakt.
En toch, schrijf ik de auto op waterstof ook nog niet helemaal af. Er hoeft maar een iemand met een briljant idee te komen, you never know...
Wie weet! Ik denk dat het te laat gaat zijn. We stevenen nu al vrij duidelijk af op een economie waarin auto's steeds minder belangrijk worden, en er steeds minder in eigendom zullen zijn. Deze hele discussie heeft alleen maar zin als er echt nog een grote economie zit in auto's, maar als auto's straks zelfrijdend zijn en Transportation-as-a-Service (TaaS) een werkelijkheid is heb je opeens het aantal benodigde auto's op zijn minst door tien gehakt, wellicht nog meer. Het is op dat punt ontzettend moeilijk om als nieuwe techniek genoeg productie te draaien om een nieuwe techniek winstgevend te maken, zelfs als het fundamenteel beter is.

Dat is waar ik het heen zie gaan. Waterstof is niet genoeg vooruit gekomen, heeft nog steeds teveel nadelen en elektrisch is ondertussen als een speer vooruit geschoten. De enige spelers die kunnen overleven zijn degenen die nu al sterk zijn. De rest van de markt zal alleen maar heel hard krimpen.

Door atze, donderdag 14 januari 2016 16:51

Ben erg benieuwd wat je vind van het gebruik van mierenzuur als brandstof opslag

nieuws: TU/e presenteert rijdend schaalmodel van auto op mierenzuur

Zo ver ik begrijk blijven de problemen met de fuelcell nog wel aanwezig.

Door Michael G, zaterdag 26 maart 2016 01:52

Fascinating stuff and thanks. The Platinum issue is definitely solvable. Just Google "Platinum substitutes for fuel cells" and you'll find a ton of research which claims cheap alternatives which work as well or better int he lab. One of them will work out in the next ten years.

I have serious problems with your calculations of the impact of personal auto use. The 14% figure you cite for the whole world is not realistic. Global GHG emissions from road transport is 22% as found here:
http://whatsyourimpact.or...es/carbon-dioxide-sources
and here (from auto manufacturers organization):
http://oica.net/wp-conten...ange-and-co2-brochure.pdf

But even that 22% for the entire world is unrealistic. Most of the world is too poor to afford a car. Better to look at use in rich countries because poor countries will become rich soon, everyone will want a car, and we can't have them spitting out GHGs at the rate rich countries currently do.

In the US, (per US Energy Information Agency) roughly 33% of GHG emissions come from petroleum used in transport. 18% of these GHGs are from personal-use autos and light trucks. Another 6% of GHG comes from freight trucks - much of it local delivery. That is 24%. In Germany, transport accounts for 18% of GHG emissions. Seen here:
https://www.cleanenergywi...sions-and-climate-targets

In the EU, road transport is 20% of GHG emissions:
http://ec.europa.eu/clima...ort/vehicles/index_en.htm

Cars are 12% of total EU GHG emissions:
http://ec.europa.eu/clima...ehicles/cars/index_en.htm

Looking at France shows what might this might become if all power comes from non-carbon sources since France gets 80% of its power from nuclear and 15% from hydro. French autos contribute 25% of their GHG emissions.

I disagree that most people don't drive far. The average American drives 15,000 miles/year. The average German drives 8,400 miles.
https://ideas.repec.org/p/diw/diwwpp/dp602.html

Most daily driving is local - 35 miles on average in the US. Given the excellent public transport in the EU, it is likely that European cars make fewer local trips and more weekend trips. People want to have the range for those weekend trips. They simply will *not* buy a car without that range regardless if it makes sense to you or me. We know what range people want because the cost of increasing an ICE's fuel tank is minimal. People expect 250-350 mile range in their cars. EVs can't provide that, so they don't sell in significant numbers. Teslas have that range so they sell quite well in their price class. Despite large govt. incentives, and relatively low prices, EVs and Plug-in Hybrid EVs have been stuck at 0.8% market share of the US for years now, including Teslas. And that is better than most other countries.

If you Google "EVs vs FC cars (images)" you will get a lot of charts showing that the main advantage FCs have over Li-Ion batteries is energy density - roughly 10 times more - for range. Li-ion has about 10 times greater power density (acceleration). A Tesla has 540 kg of battery for its 265 mile range. Since 90% of the miles driven are local, it is carrying about 400 kg of battery it is not using most of the time. Expensive and very heavy battery which slowly degrades and has to be recharged. Better to have a battery for the 90% of the miles that are local and a fuel tank with some more energy dense fuel like hydrogen or oil for weekend trips and vacations. A plug-in hybrid like the Chevrolet Volt will do. As nice as it would be to have GHG-free oil from algae or something, we need to hedge our bets and provide the option of hydrogen made without GHG emissions.

Door Tweakers user mux, zaterdag 26 maart 2016 08:00

Michael G schreef op zaterdag 26 maart 2016 @ 01:52:
Fascinating stuff and thanks. The Platinum issue is definitely solvable. Just Google "Platinum substitutes for fuel cells" and you'll find a ton of research which claims cheap alternatives which work as well or better int he lab. One of them will work out in the next ten years.
You're saying that, but I've been following this business for pretty much 15 years now. Every year there are tens of 'breakthrough' new catalysts, everything ranging from nickel-manganese nanodots to graphene. Even biological ones. But once you actually start looking at the research, there are always a few common threads:
- Either the activity is still orders of magnitude behind
- They only tested up to very low activities
- The compound is not stable in water
- It needs a large overvoltage (even though activity is similar)

There has, so far, been zero improvement over the catalysts we've already discovered at the start of the century (those being nickel-based), and those aren't being used for very good reasons. And again, the research money that is available in catalyst research is absolutely piddly when compared to battery research or many other fields in alternative energy. Yes, if we would be putting as much money into it as we've put into putting a man into the moon, I would agree that we may see some actual commercializable breakthrough in 5 years. But for now, it seems quite a ways off. Again; essentially no progress on finding alternative catalysts in 15 or so years.
I have serious problems with your calculations of the impact of personal auto use. The 14% figure you cite for the whole world is not realistic. Global GHG emissions from road transport is 22% as found (...)
Energy use and GHG emissions are two different things! I'm talking strictly about energy footprint, for the purposes of calculating the impact on the electric grid. I'll fully concede that GHG emissions are a separate and higher metric.

[quote]
I disagree that most people don't drive far. The average American drives 15,000 miles/year. The average German drives 8,400 miles.
https://ideas.repec.org/p/diw/diwwpp/dp602.html

Most daily driving is local - 35 miles on average in the US. Given the excellent public transport in the EU, it is likely that European cars make fewer local trips and more weekend trips. People want to have the range for those weekend trips. (...)[./quote]

This is by far mostly a psychological issue. The fact is that if you start measuring actual trip time and distance, the vast majority of cars are used the vast majority of time for trips under 10mi, less in the EU. In an optimal world, if anybody had free choice of cars at any time, the vast majority of cars could actually be low-range, efficient EVs right now.

But I do agree fully that this psychological issue is the main driver of EV range anxiety today and that frankly the EV manufacturers will have to give us decent range to make us buy them, regardless of incentives or environmental issues. But my main position here is that this is a psychological issue more than a factual one.
If you Google "EVs vs FC cars (images)" you will get a lot of charts showing that the main advantage FCs have over Li-Ion batteries is energy density - roughly 10 times more - for range. Li-ion has about 10 times greater power density (acceleration). A Tesla has 540 kg of battery for its 265 mile range. Since 90% of the miles driven are local, it is carrying about 400 kg of battery it is not using most of the time. Expensive and very heavy battery which slowly degrades and has to be recharged. Better to have a battery for the 90% of the miles that are local and a fuel tank with some more energy dense fuel like hydrogen or oil for weekend trips and vacations. A plug-in hybrid like the Chevrolet Volt will do. As nice as it would be to have GHG-free oil from algae or something, we need to hedge our bets and provide the option of hydrogen made without GHG emissions.
Even if you'd hedge your bets with hydrogen, in a scenario where you're dealing with a fuel cell-battery hybrid I would absolutely never even consider using hydrogen. It's a bitch to work with and impossible to get good infrastructure up for in a reasonable time. If you dont need the fuel cell to be on-demand, I'd just ditch the whole PEM route and go to methanol/ethanol/muriatic acid-fueled SOFCs rightaway. They require vastly less platinum loading, they can run on pretty much any fuel (even fuels available nowadays) and they're great for recharging batteries, be it stationary or on the go. And they boast better efficiency to boot.

Whatever the case, fuel cells will always be nothing more than a bridge technology to EVs, if they even do that much to begin with. It shouldn't be treated as a full drivetrain technology. Just treat it like a range extender. Makes stuff so much easier.

Door Michael G, zaterdag 26 maart 2016 16:14

Thanks for taking the time to reply. It appears we substantially agree. Acceptance is a psychological issue, but that does not make it less important. As India and China reach for cars/person levels of the US and Europe, you can write the epitaph for humanity now unless we get some widely accepted alternative propulsion soon.

I agree fuel cells (H2 or SOFC) make sense (if they do) only as a range extender with battery used for the 90% of miles done daily in short trips. Unlike batteries, FCs have no regenerative ability or much power. But we will definitely need a bridge tech of some sort. FCs offer the hope that with very cheap solar-wind generated electricity we can make our own fuel. As you point out, electrolysis is very simple. You can buy now on Amazon a FC recharger for very small FCs. It should scale to car-size FCs for home use.
http://www.amazon.com/Hor...es-Handheld/dp/B009R13Y38


The Tesla Giga-factory will cost $5 Billion and take 5 years to reach full capacity for 500,000 cars/year. To supply all new cars with 200-mile range batteries we need the equivalent of 35 Giga-factories for the US alone and literally hundreds for the entire world. No company will build a Giga-factory until they are convinced they will sell the cars so battery manufacturing capacity will grow slowly, even if the coming 200-mile range lower priced BEVs gain wide acceptance (a big "if"). Even if you cut both time and $ in half it will take far too long to build enough Giga-factories to make a dent in GHG emissions in a reasonable time to halt global warming. However, make that 50-mile range batteries with some range extender and you only need 9 Giga-factories for the US - not nearly as intimidating.

It would take 20 years to replace the entire world fleet of ICE cars if you sold *only* alternative tech cars tomorrow. With BEVs (including PHEVs) at 0.8% US market share and stagnant, we are not making progress.

And batteries are expensive and heavy for longer range. Auto cos. go to great lengths to lighten up BEVs in other ways but those are expensive themselves. Tesla's aluminum body costs 3 to 6 times steel, while the BMW i3's carbon-fiber body is 40x more expensive than steel, making it too expensive for the poorer countries where the growth in car sales is.

There may come a battery like Al-air that provides the energy density close to that of oil but until then we need to keep all options open. The cost of FC R&D is nothing compared to things like pet food sales.

Toyota is also researching Al-air batteries. I think the current publicity on their FCVs is just to try it out on the public, get some real customer data and see how it is received. No one except oil companies is happy with the poor reception of BEVs even with heavy govt. subsidies. No auto co. is making money on BEVs or PHEVs - even Tesla only survives because they sell CO2 credits to the other auto cos. which is a form of govt subsidy.

There are a large number of privately-owned H2 refueling for FCs in industrial applications so maybe not be much of an infrastructure issue should FCs gain acceptance. If FCs are only needed for the 10% of miles batteries don't cover, then you only need 10% as many fuel stations, mostly near highways - again, not such a big problem.

Batteries degrade and behave less well in very cold and very hot situations (like Arizona and Minnesota) so they have their problems, too. Recharging efficiency and time are serious problems for the average user. See a (liberal) physicist's detailed but disappointing calculations of his plug-in hybrid's battery's cost-effectiveness, particularly the section starting with "Batteries Stink" in the post here:
http://physics.ucsd.edu/d...l-ev-bite-back/#more-1397
followed up later here:
http://physics.ucsd.edu/d...5/08/my-chicken-of-an-ev/
(excellent and informative replies there as well)

Thanks again for your excellent explanation of H2 FCs in the prior 3 posts. I recommend it to anyone interested in FCs.

Door Tweakers user mux, zaterdag 2 april 2016 18:12

Michael G schreef op zaterdag 26 maart 2016 @ 16:14:
As you point out, electrolysis is very simple. You can buy now on Amazon a FC recharger for very small FCs. It should scale to car-size FCs for home use.
http://www.amazon.com/Hor...es-Handheld/dp/B009R13Y38
Electrolysis is ridiculously easy to do to some extent, but scaling it up to the required purity and volume is not trivial. You need very high catalyst activity to get electrolysis to be even halfway decent for producing hydrogen. If you stick with low-activity noninert electrodes (like graphite, graphene, nickel, silver, etc.), you will get either significant electrode poisoning or the production of side products. Also, high overvoltage is not a reasonable option, because the formation energies of lots of hydrogen-oxygen-carbon-nitrogen compounds are close to that of the thermoneutral voltage of water electrolysis, which means you'll create too large concentrations of unwanted compounds. In non-technical language: Even then, efficiency is not that high and you'll be losing the vast majority of your primary energy in conversion steps to power at the wheel, which creates a hard cost and feasibility barrier even for small plants.
The Tesla Giga-factory will cost $5 Billion and take 5 years to reach full capacity for 500,000 cars/year. To supply all new cars with 200-mile range batteries we need the equivalent of 35 Giga-factories for the US alone and literally hundreds for the entire world. No company will build a Giga-factory until they (...)
Let me stop you here; the gigafactory has a lot of marketing and buzz around it, but it's not a special facility. It's special for the US, because there is almost no production in the USA and very little industry incentive. BYD, Samsung, Sanyo, Golden Power and a few other manufacturers have already built, are building or are planning to build multiple larger facilities. World battery production is currently ramping up so fast that we can expect sufficient (and sufficiently cheap) supply to produce more than 25% of cars in electric form by 2020. Even the most pessimistic estimates put 2020 production at about 10 gigafactories worth, even though right now the total world production is less than 1GWh/yr.

This is already in the order of magnitude needed to have large-scale shifts in mobility powered by batteries, using forecasts on technology available in 2013.

Right now, using the most advanced fuel cell technology, total world production would halt at about 1GW/yr due to precious metal shortage, and that would already cause a significant spike in Pt and Pd prices. 1GW nameplate translates to at most 30k cars per annum. Actual projected production capacity is, at best, 10ku per year in 2020 (Toyota). If by some miracle all our technical issues are solved, fuel cells will not be able to fulfill 10% of world vehicle demand until 2035, i.e. you are effectively operating on a 15 year disadvantage. This is the reality of macro-economics right now. Fuel cells are incapable, just by virtue of economics, to ever become a transition technology even if everybody really wanted them to.
It would take 20 years to replace the entire world fleet of ICE cars if you sold *only* alternative tech cars tomorrow. With BEVs (including PHEVs) at 0.8% US market share and stagnant, we are not making progress.
We're making very big progress at the moment. It's not reasonable to use linear extrapolation on current growth trends, because we're at the start of an exponential curve.
And batteries are expensive and heavy for longer range. Auto cos. go to great lengths to lighten up BEVs in other ways but those are expensive themselves. Tesla's aluminum body costs 3 to 6 times steel, while the BMW i3's carbon-fiber body is 40x more expensive than steel, making it too expensive for the poorer countries where the growth in car sales is.
All true, but a vehicle doesn't need to be light. American cars have proven that you can build a country on cars that are 3-4 times the weight of competing countries.
There may come a battery like Al-air that provides the energy density close to that of oil but until then we need to keep all options open. The cost of FC R&D is nothing compared to things like pet food sales.
Options should be open that make economic and/or technical sense. People will always research all options, but as long as there is no business case to be made for them, there is no reason to preferentially treat some alternative technology. Solar and BEVs are breaking into the mainstream not because they're better for the environment, but because they're cheaper and technically better than older, more polluting alternatives. Economics always wins. People and the environment always lose.
Toyota is also researching Al-air batteries. I think the current publicity on their FCVs is just to try it out on the public, get some real customer data and see how it is received. No one except oil companies is happy with the poor reception of BEVs even with heavy govt. subsidies. No auto co. is making money on BEVs or PHEVs - even Tesla only survives because they sell CO2 credits to the other auto cos. which is a form of govt subsidy.
To some extent, yes. But it's certainly not true that PHEVs and BEVs are being sold purely as loss leaders. Subsidies only make out a very small part of total vehicle cost of ownership. The largest subsidies and incentives I've seen are still sub-30%, which means the underlying technology is well within the order of magnitude of cost to be economically viable. This goes more into the economics of subsidies and incentives, which is relatively complex but it generally boils down to: if you're subsidizing less than 50% of something and it's rapidly becoming cheaper because of the learning effect, it's probably already near independent economic viability.
There are a large number of privately-owned H2 refueling for FCs in industrial applications so maybe not be much of an infrastructure issue should FCs gain acceptance. If FCs are only needed for the 10% of miles batteries don't cover, then you only need 10% as many fuel stations, mostly near highways - again, not such a big problem.
Right now almost all H2 stations on the map are privately owned. 81 in the States, 2 in the Netherlands, 20 in Japan. Only very few are gov't owned. http://www.netinform.net/...Continent=EU&StationID=-1
Batteries degrade and behave less well in very cold and very hot situations (like Arizona and Minnesota) so they have their problems, too. Recharging efficiency and time are serious problems for the average user.
Again; totally agree, but these aren't inherent problems with batteries that fuel cells or any other alternative technology solves outright. Fuel cells have similar issues with heat and cold. Fuel cells degrade significantly faster than batteries. These problems are solvable for both technologies. This has been similarly troublesome in the history of ICE development.

Door EHS, zaterdag 11 juni 2016 00:50

Thanks for the great post! Good fun reading.

I'm going to agree with the commenters urging the importance of range. Three reasons:

1) Under an ownership model, range is important for psychology. This point has been made by other posters (and agreed upon by the author), so I won't belabor it.

I'd just add that we have a convenient way of measuring the value of having one vehicle cover 100% of use rather than 95% of desired use: the premium people currently pay for vehicles that cover that extra 5%.

For those not transporting families, 90+% of use is solo, 98+% of use is two or fewer, and yet almost all of us own cars with five seats. The difference in price between a Smart Car, that covers the 95% of our transport that is in the city, with maybe a friend and a couple of grocery bags, max, and the cars we do buy, is on the order of $10,000, before fuel costs. In my case, I have a small SUV with AWD because I do a fair bit of skiing in the winter, but that is obviously a very small percentage of my use. And yet, I'm willing to spend a few extra thousand and sacrifice MPGs for that capability, and I'm far from alone.

So clearly, we're willing to pay a bunch more to have one car meet all of our needs. The car symbolizes freedom, and it doesn't feel very free if we can't take a road trip and do some real highway driving in it. Plus, it is currently impractical and pretty expensive to rent a car for weekends away. Car share might replace my in-town car use, shifting the case to ownership to only the 5% longest-mileage of trips.

Speaking of car sharing, 2) the whole case for car sharing is increasing utilization of vehicles, in which case you need a larger capacity battery, anyway. You can expect car-shared vehicles to be pretty constantly busy for a few hours in the morning and a few hours in the evening, getting everybody to and from work, have low but appreciable utilization midday and after 7 PM, and do most of their charging overnight. Thus the 200-300 mile range that makes road trips possible is about right for shared vehicles, too.

3) For personal ownership or car sharing, there are some pretty big advantages of a large capacity battery that go beyond range.

#1 is battery lifetime - the vast majority of wear done to a battery happens at the edges of the charge/discharge cycle. If you look at the lifetime cost of a battery, it's much cheaper to overprovision the battery by 20-30% than to save 20-30% on a smaller battery.

The other thing is that unlike for ICE cars, increasing range for a BEV also increases charging speed and power. For personal cars, power is fun, and charging speed helps on those road-trips we all buy our cars dreaming about. For shared cars, charging speed reduces the need for expensive urban space in which to park the vehicles while charging, which is rather important given that saving urban space is one of the essential advantages of car sharing.

The bottom line, I think, is that we do need reasonably large batteries for EVs to take off. That the Model S outsells BEVs 1/2 or 1/3 of its price is a testament to this.

The good news is, battery prices are already there for luxury vehicles, and falling fast. The future looks fun.

Door Tweakers user bilgy_no1, zaterdag 24 september 2016 18:06

Thank you for a great in-depth series of posts about the challenges in implementing hydrogen as a mass scale energy carrier for cars. I fully agree with the general conclusion that BEV-technology is the more elegant solution, with enormous cost and efficiency advantages.

A few remarks on the issue of range. People keep bringing that up as an obstacle to large scale BEV adoption. Here's how I see it
  • On the one hand, you are right in pointing out that most cars drive less than 35 miles per day. It differs a bit per country, but generally speaking the range offered by the current models is sufficient for the daily driving needs of most motorists. On the other hand however, the economics of BEV work at high annual mileage as a result of high purchase price and low running costs. So, with only 10.000 km per year, it is not yet economical to drive an electric car. Especially if a big part of the 10.000 km may be a 3 week holiday driving around 3000 km where the BEV with small range isn't practical yet.
  • So, for people who do not drive so much, the breakthrough will come when cheaper models become available as well as affordable second hand models.
  • So, with high annual mileage, you're talking about people who drive long distances every day, and there the range per day may not be sufficient (e.g. real-world range of 150km in the Nissan LEAF). Tesla is the only BEV that meats this criterium currently, but:
  • There will be more affordable models with longer range in the very near future. Everyone has heard of the Tesla 3, but not many know that there will be a Chevrolet Bolt/Ope e-Ampera, new generation Nissan LEAF, long range Volkswagen e-Golf, not even mentioning that Volvo is going full electric in a couple of years, and that we can expect some Chinese models from e.g. BYD as well. So, when there are more BEV's with a good enough range for the long distance salespeople driving 200-300 km per day, we can expect a higher adoption rate. Especially if there continue to be tax incentives like on lease cars in the Netherlands.
  • However, all of this requires a mental shift in the general public as well as technological advances. I drive a Nissan LEAF, and it works for me. However, I do drive very economically. Someone who's used to driving 130 km/h in all weather conditions will soon find the range is much lower than advertised. This naturally applies to fossil cars as well. In the discussion under blog nr. 2 I believe you showed that driving 150 km/h takes 220% of the fuel of driving 100 km/h, so that also diminishes the range of a fossil car. People need to realise this in order to have a proper expectation and driving style.
  • Even a 400 km/h daily driver may be enough for most people, but there's still the holiday trip. So, for the occassional trip, people can rent a car easily. There are even leaseplans that include 3 week fossil car rental for that purpose.
  • There need to be more different BEV car models in different shapes. E.g. a very popular body shape in the NL is the station wagon, but it's not available as a BEV.
So there are some obstacles, but I'm hopeful that technology and policy will continue to push BEV adoption.

Now, as to FCV's. You mentioned briefly that you do not believe in a conspiracy. I'm not so sure to decline a conspiracy. E.g. Shell is investing in the German hydrogen highway project. The objective might not be to keep selling us oil, but rather to keep a centralised fuel system that allows them to control flows.

Hydrogen cars were pushed enormously in California because of the way they were favoured in the Clean Car standards (counted for more credits than BEV's). This was lobbied by car manufacturers, even though BEV's were closer to market at that time already.

Door Tweakers user databeestje, maandag 2 januari 2017 11:04

Just as a datapoint relating to electric cars and their range. I drive a Mitsubishi i-MiEV, it's one of the smallest and has a 50 mile range in winter and 70 in sumer.

I drove 24000km with it, or 15000 miles, depending on where you live. That is a significant amount and falls into line with most of the graphs and data published. We do have a second car (Suzuki Swift) and we drove it far less last year saving cost in fuel while at the same time saving money on driving electric. The savings are significant, the electric car cost 1400 euros, the petrol 2500. We saved 1400 euro on the electric on cost per mile and about 400 less on petrol by shifting our usage.

Work related driving turns out to be about 97% of the distance traveled last year. Turns out I fast charge about 20 times a year when range didn't meet demand, the rest of the time I just plug it in and walk away (work or home).

Would I have liked more range? Yes! Absolutely! Would I liked to have a bigger car? Yes! Absolutely!

The thing is, the 2nd hand car market doesn't work really well because there are not enough cars around yet. I'll have to wait a bit before I can find something better. Meanwhile, this is good enough.

Also, regarding the 2nd hand car market, I'd like to point out that the existing Car Manufacturers are not really catering to the electric car market properly. (Except Tesla)
There is no choice in battery sizes (you get small and that's it), performance choices (just 1 motor, really? Is this Henry Ford?), towing (somehow a thing in NL) and dimensions (SUV/Wagon/Van)

If you make a datamatrix it would highlight that just 1 manufacturer right now is giving customers choice. That is frightening.

Reactie formulier
(verplicht)
(verplicht, maar wordt niet getoond)
(optioneel)

Voer de code van onderstaand anti-spam plaatje in: